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Thread: With so many arts in the school, what are you working on?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian S. View Post
    Example: opponent is throwing a step-in cross after his initial jab, you read the lightness of the jab and see his feet start to change; you don't try to swing at the cross or catch it on an elbow (could though), you step-off at an angle and drive that sweet hook or liver shot deeeeeeep into him as the cross hits the air that used to be occupied by you. You don;t have to beat the timing, or try to get off before he does, just execute the END first. You want to end up with your fist deep in enemy territory, ideally organs and bowels; so rather than cut-off the strike, which requires a lot more practice, get used to cutting off the entire exchange at* the opening.
    Yes, I mean there's more than one way to skin a cat as the saying goes, or at least there are multiple opinions on how to do it! For example there's a widely renowned "reality based" martial arts instructor in the UK called Geoff Thompson who reckons that neither parrying, moving the head, blocking, footwork or anything else is quick enough to rely upon in a streetfight because action is quicker than reaction and that's that according to him, so his view is the only thing that works is to hit first, so that its your action and the other guys reaction. But then, as well as martial artists, I think Floyd Mayweather and lots of boxing coaches would disagree.

    For me, the thing I have the most experience in at full speed full contact sparring is boxing. I did used to use footwork a lot, but ever since switching clubs/coaches and learning how to parry and use my hands properly, I've relied on that since, I find it suits me better. Within that, when boxing at least, and I haven't worked all this enough in kungfu yet, but I did indeed find that "intercepting" as you say was difficult and by that I simply mean parrying, meaning letting the left jab for instance go slightly past your right hand and then palming it slightly downwards or to the left, connecting with it on the side of the fist or the wrist. That sometimes worked, but what worked for me better was "catching" the punch ie meeting the knuckles part of their glove more or less flat against my palm. I know its force against force. I know that given the choice between catching and parrying, it is better to parry if you can, but given the choice between missing the parry then getting punched in the face, or catching it, I would prefer to catch it!

    But I think the way we use guard hands in our kungfu, and in other kungfu styles, is more suited to parrying and intercepting than the typical boxing stance is, so I don't worry too much about that.

    What I say above though is too geared towards boxing. I think in Muay Thai, MMA/Wrestling/Jujitsu and Kungfu, it is not so wise to just stand your ground or come forward all the time like many boxers do, it seems to me many of the possible attacks in those disciplines require movement to avoid, so I think my strategy is mainly suited to boxers and typical streetfighters.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian S. View Post
    Using kung fu for this has been very advantageous in past when encountering heavily loaded-up strikes; for subtle, faster jabs and combinations, what has helped and saved me more than ANYTHING so far has been my stance and structure, no question. SOOOOOOO many boxers and quite a huge number of muay thai exponents need that style of mechanical, muscular "propulsion" movement to engage or disengage; with a solid stance, you don;t need to burst, or plant, or explode; you can deliver and take whatever at all times and all ranges. Once in close, where I like to be in boxing to smother strikes, kill their range power, and start dropping body shots or peeling and pressing their hands for head hooks, my stance and structure are the only things that will let me generate the necessary power, struggle-force to smother, and also integrity to not get pushed away or fold from incoming hits that get through.
    Yes I also think a huge advantage a person practising internal kungfu has, is that their strikes can just "shoot" out from the dantien, whereas boxers etc have to "throw" theirs. I know great boxers such as James Toney can still do so very fast and get great leverage in seemingly small movements and distances, but not everyone can.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by drunken boxer View Post
    Hi David, probably it started because the first time through, I couldn't see how to use anything in the basic sequences against a boxer, like when I tried black tiger, fierce tiger or precious duck, I just got hit myself even when it was just someone playing a boxer let alone a real boxer, and I never saw anyone else using them either at full speed against a boxer at that point.

    However in hindsight, a lot of that was probably to do with incorrect covering/opening/use of guard hand for one thing.

    And on the other thread I keep mentioning, Matt Fenton generously shared a sequence he practises composed from the basic sequences, that I took on in part, and have since managed to use with some moderate success against a boxer. So the upshot is, I should take a project to revisit the basic sequences with those insights. It's one of a few things I would plan to do when my work/life balance shifts a bit more toward life in future hopefully!
    Hey DB,

    In my experience sparring a bit here and there to confirm and progress in my practice I've found that the trick to making kung fu work that you shouldn't need to "Make" it work. With sufficient repetition of stances/footwork, strikes, bridging, applications, and methodological training of spontaneity it is just ingrained into your body, it is natural, so you just fight smart and the kung fu comes out as it is supposed to -- in a way that matches the situation. I truly believe that anyone with dedication and courage can accomplish this.

    I've been watching some boxing lately, a lot of the striking techniques we use are present if a bit mechanically different, and used without bridging and with boxing footwork. Fighting is fighting, methods may differ, but it seems as though the biggest commonality is that successful fighters are the ones that train sufficiently till they can move and attack and defend naturally. Kung fu is no different in this respect.

    Hope this helps, it's helping me.
    Shaolin Wahnam USA

  4. #34
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    I think that is true so long as it is ingrained and tested under pressure the same way boxers do.

  5. #35
    Mark CH is offline Sifu Mark Hartnett - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Ireland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Do View Post
    Some people just have far too much time on their hands
    Yeah some people huh

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by drunken boxer View Post
    I think that is true so long as it is ingrained and tested under pressure the same way boxers do.
    Yup. It's up to each of us to do that. No one will ingrain the basics for us, it takes a lot of sweat, hard work, and dedication. Sparring a boxer or a muay thai person right after learning the basics doesn't give any time to ingrain. I tried that too back when I started, it didn't work out so well for me either.
    Shaolin Wahnam USA

  7. #37
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    I know this thread is about "What are you working on" but here is one thing I would like to work on in future too, I think we have a couple of pages like this but saw this one at the top of Sifu's website a couple of days ago, about Shaolin groundfighting:

    http://shaolin.org/video-clips-5/sab...shaolin98.html

  8. #38
    Martin Do's Avatar
    Martin Do is offline Martin Do - Assistant Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam England (2009)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick_Chu View Post
    Welcome to the party, Martin siheng! How has the practice been treating you lately?
    Hi Frederick,

    Training has been very kind to me thank you and I am enjoying it. I started going through some old drills again in recent weeks and am pleasantly surprised how quickly things falls back into place.

    This is an interesting and lively thread. Love the enthusiasm shown for Shaolin Kung Fu here and have enjoyed reading the posts even if I can’t picture in my head the descriptions of moves a lot of times . Good stuff.

    Best wishes everyone

    Martin

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