Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 66

Thread: 18 Lohan hands : 10 Questions to Grandmaster Wong

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lübeck
    Posts
    80
    Dear Sitaigung,

    in the past, you recommended specific exercises to overcome specific health problems. Nowadays, with the tremendous improvement in your teaching methology, you kindly explained to us that it is the chi flow induced by and following the exercise which leads to the benefits of Chi Kung.

    At our current level of attainment, how important is exercise selection to overcome specific health problems?

    For example, if a new student has a problem in his lower back and practises only Lifting The Sky or only Carrying the Moon, would there be a difference in his recovery if all other factors were equal?

    Thank you very much in advance for your reply and thank you to Sisookgung Roland for making this Q&A possible!

    With a big smile from the heart,
    Steffen

  2. #12
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995

    18 Lohan Hands Answer 1-Part 1

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 1 Part 1

    Question 1

    It is said that from the 500 Arahants or Lohans, Bodhidharma chose to honor 18 of them that were most appreciated by the Chinese to overcome cultural differences when spreading Buddhism to China. Also most Chi Kung and Kung Fu sets are based on the “magic number” of 18 or multiples of it due to Bodhidharma’s choice.

    Can you please tell us more about these 18 Lohans?

    Are there any records how the Shaolin monks practiced the 18 Lohan Hands in the past? (i.e. for how long; how many repetitions; all exercises at once or separately; did they develop chi flow similar to ours; etc.)

    Sifu Leonard


    Answer

    An Arahant, or Lohan in Chinese, is one who has attained Enlightenment. The term “Arahant” is often used in Hinayana Buddhism. In Mahayana Buddhism, one who has attained Enlightenment is called a Buddha. The term “Lohan” is often used in Chinese Buddhism to denote a disciple who learned directly from the Buddha.

    I am not sure whether it was Bodhidharma who introduced the 18 Lohans into China, but the 18 Lohans are certainly very popular in Chinese Buddhism, and they are frequently worshipped in Chinese Buddhist temples.

    I don’t think these 18 Lohans were selected to differentiate between Indian and Chinese culture. In fact both their names and the appearance they are normally depicted are Indian. Their Sanskrit names are transliterated into Chinese characters.

    For example, the first Lohan is Pindola Bharadvaja, and is called Pin-tu-lo-Po-lo-to-she in Chinese. It is worthy of note that “Pin-tu-lo-Po-lo-to-she” is the Chinese pronunciation in classical times. The written Chinese characters are the same, but because the sounds of the characters have changed over time, the modern pronunciation of the same words in Mandarin is Bīndùluó Báluóduòshé.

    “Pin-tu-lo-Po-lo-to-she” is not a name easy for typical Chinese to remember. Hence the Lohans are often addressed by their attributes. Pin-tu-lo-Po-lo-to-she, or Pindola Bharadvaja in Sanskrit, is usually depicted as riding a dear. Hence, he is often addressed as Dear-Riding Lohan, or Qílù Luóhàn in Modern Mandarin pronunciation.

    The 18 Lohans are listed below with their names in Sanskrit, their Chinese transliterations as pronounced in classical times, their attributes, their modern pronunciation in Mandarin, and a brief description.

    The order of the listing is not dependent on their seniority or the level of their spiritual development, but on the order of their appearance before a famous artist. In 891 CE the 18 Lohans appeared before Guan Xiu who painted them. The emperor made copies of the images and distributed them over China.

    The 6th Lohan, Po-t’e-lo or Bhadra, is sometimes confused with Bodhdharma, our First Patriarch. Bodhidharma, who lived more than a thousand years after the Buddha, could not be a Lohan, i.e. his direct disciple. Bodhidharma is regarded as a Bodhisattva, rather than a Lohan.

    1. Pindola Bharadvaja - Pin-tu-lo-Po-lo-to-she,. Deer-Riding Lohan - Qílù Luóhàn
    Sitting dignified on a dear, he had long eye-brows, was noted for psychic powers, and his voice was like the roar of a lion.

    2. Kanaka Vatsa - Ka-no-ka-Fa-tso, Joyful Lohan - Xǐqìng Luóhàn
    He was very skillful in public speaking and debates. He said that happiness was experienced through the five senses but joy was experienced from within. He sometimes banged cymbals in his joy.

    3. Karaka Bharadvaja - Ka-no-ka-Po-li-tou-she, Raised Bow Lohan - Jǔbō Luóhàn
    A mendicant monk who asked for alms by raising his bowl, he often raised one leg in the air representing royal ease. He symbolized receiving gifts gracefully.

    4. Subhinda - Su-p’in-t’e,. Lift Pagoda Lohan - Tuōda Luóhàn
    He was the last disciple of the Buddha. He held a pagoda in his hand as a remembrance for the Buddha. The pagoda was then introduced into China.

    5. Nakula - No-ku-lo,. Meditating Lohand - Jìngzuò Luóhàn
    He was a great warrior with tremendous strength who later became a monk. He attained Enlightenment through meditation.

    6. Bhadra - Po-t’e-lo,. Oversea Lohan - Guojiāng Luóhàn
    His name meant virtuous and sagacious. He spread the Dharma across the seas to the East Indies and Java.
    Last edited by Luo Lang; 20th May 2013 at 11:35 AM.
    "From formless to form, from form to formless"

    26.08.17-28.08.17: Qi Gong Festival with 6 courses in Bern:
    Qiflow-Triple Stretch Method-12 Sinewmetamorphisis-Bone Marrow Cleansing-Zen Mind in Qi Gong

    Website: www.enerqi.ch

  3. #13
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 1 Part 2

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 1 Part 2

    7. Kalika - Ka-li-ka, Elephant-Riding Lohan - Qíxiàng Luóhàn
    He was an elephant tamer. The elephant symbolizes strength, endurance and perseverance. Kalika represents patience, concentration and diligence.

    8. Vajraputra - Fa-she-lo-fuh-to-lo,. Laughing Lion Lohan - Xiàoshī Luóhàn
    He advocated that both practice and understanding were necessary to attain wisdom. He was a former lion hunter before becoming a monk. A lion club joined him, grateful that he gave up his former profession.

    9. Gobaka - Shu-po-ka, Open Heart Lohan - Kāixīn Luóhàn
    Open the heart and see the Buddha. Gobaka was a crown prince. His younger brother started a rebellion but Gobaka assuring his brother that he would denounce the kingdom to become a monk, took of his garment and exposed a Buddha image on his heart.

    10. Maha Panthaka – Mo-ha Pan-t’o-ka, Lifting Hands -Tànshǒu Luóhàn
    He was a prince but became a monk. After meditation he would raise his hands like Lifting the Sky.

    11. Rahula - Lo-hu-lo,. Deep Concentration Lohan - Chénsi Luóhàn
    He was the Buddha’s son before the Buddha left the palace. Later he sought his father for his inheritance. His boyish look reflected his youth compared to the other Lohans.

    12. Nagasena - Na-ka-si-na,. Ear Cleansing Loahn - Wāěr Luóhàn
    Nagasena was usually depicted cleansing his ears which symbolized always hearing everything correctly. He had great supernatural powers and was an eloquent speaker and debater. He answered King Milinda’s famous questions.

    13. Angida - Yin-kie-t’e, Cloth Bag Lohan – Budai Luohan
    Angida was a snake-catcher preventing them from harming people. He took off their fangs, put them into his bag and released them in the mountains, which symbolized exchanging bad for good.

    14. Vanavasa - Fa-na-p’o-ssu, Banana Tree Lohan - Bājiāo Luóhàn
    He was born during a heavy rainstorm, thus his name which meant rain. He liked to meditate under a banana tree.

    15. Ajita - A-shih-to, Long Eyebrow Lohan – Changmei Luohan
    He was born with two long eyebrows. In his previous life he was a monk who failed to attain Enlightenment even cultivating to old age with only two eyebrows left. He attained Enlightenment in this life.

    16. Chota-Panthaka - Chu-t’a -Pan-t’o-ka, Door Watching Lohan – Kanmen Luohan
    He was so slow-witted that he could not remember a single line of the Buddha’s teaching. The Buddha taught him to sweep the floor, and each time he swept he recited the word “Sweep”. In this way he focused his mind and attained Enlightenment.

    17. Nantimitolo - Nam-ti-mi-to-lo, Subduing Dragon Lohan – Xianglong Luohan
    People stole Buddhist sutras. The Dragon King flooded the area and restored the sutras in his palace. Nantimitolo, which means Happy Friend, subdued the dragon guard and restored the sutras to the world.

    18. Pindola - Pin-tu-lo, Taming Tiger Lohan – Fuhu Luohan
    Pindola was a Brahmin and a general who later became a monk. He heard a tiger howling every day. He gathered vegetarian food from the temple and fed the tiger.

    Although the 18 Lohan Hands are in honour of the 18 Lohans, it does not mean that each hand or technique is derived from each of the 18 Lohans. However, the first pattern of the 18 Lohan Hands, Lifting the Sky, was likely to derive from Maha Panthaka, or Mo-ha Pan-t’o-ka in Chinese, who frequently lifted his hands after completing his meditation.

    Yes, many Shaolin chi kung and kungfu sets are based on the number 18 in honour of the 18 Lohans. In our school, for example, we have the 18 Lohan Hands, 18-Lohan Art, 18 Shaolin chi Kung Techniques, and 18 Jewels.

    In Shaolin Kungfu, many sets are based on 18 or multiples of it. For example, Four Gates, Tiger-Crane, Dragon-Tiger, and Lohan Asks the Way have 36 patterns. Flower Set, Iron Wire and Dragon Strength have 72 patterns. Triple Stretch and Essence of Shaolin have 108 patterns.
    "From formless to form, from form to formless"

    26.08.17-28.08.17: Qi Gong Festival with 6 courses in Bern:
    Qiflow-Triple Stretch Method-12 Sinewmetamorphisis-Bone Marrow Cleansing-Zen Mind in Qi Gong

    Website: www.enerqi.ch

  4. #14
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 1 Part 3

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 1 Part 3:

    (Continued from Part 2)

    Although there were pictures showing how the 18 Lohan Hands were practiced by the Shaolin monks in the past, there were no records how these 18 Lohan Hands were practiced. Because of its long history, there are a few different versions of the 18 Lohan Hands. In some versions, the 18 Lohan Hands were practiced like exercises in Sinew Metamorphosis. In some versions they were practiced will sitting in a lotus position.

    There was no definite record of for how long and for how many repetitions the 18 Lohan Hands were performed. This was probably because the time taken and the number of repetitions depended on various factors like the objectives of the training sessions and the developmental stages of the monks.

    Nevertheless, from various records I have the impression that the Shaolin monks in the past practiced all the 18 Lohan Hands as a set instead of individual patterns as we usually do in our school. I also believe that the monks took a longer time to practice the 18 Lohan Hands, perhaps an hour per session, not just 15 minutes a session as recommended in our school.

    As far as I can gather from classical records as well as from genuine Shaolin lineages practicing the 18 Lohan Hands, the Shaolin monks in the past as well as modern practitioners of genuine lineages did not develop chi flow similar to ours. They merely performed the patterns, and any chi flow, which was slight compared to us, was during the performance of the patterns. Sometimes they might sway for a few seconds, poetically known as Flowing Breeze Swaying Willows, after performing the whole set of 18 Lohan Hands. This was also how I learned and practiced the 18 Lohan Hands from my sifu, Sifu Ho Fatt Nam.

    The vigorous chi flow movements commonly seen in our school was developed in my long years of teaching. When I first taught chi kung to the public in the 1970s, I taught the 18 Lohan Hands in a package course of 6 months. Many kungfu and chi kung masters laughed at me, commenting how I could teach chi kung in six months. In their concept, chi kung training took years. Some were angry at me for teaching non-Chinese.

    Initially I taught the 18 Lohan Hands the way I learned from my sifu, Sifu Ho Fatt Nam, which was performing the patterns with focus on perfect form and correct breathing, and which was also the way chi kung was taught by genuine Shaolin masters. It took my early students about 4 to 6 months to have some visible chi flow movements. This was quite remarkable as I myself took more than a year to have similar results, and I was regarded as an exemplary student.

    By the 1980s, chi flow movements had become more vigorous, but still they were nothing compared to what our students now experience. The increase of chi flow movements in both frequency and intensity was due much to my practice and study of a different genre of chi kung called Five-Animal Play, later more commonly known as Self-Manifested Chi Movement. By then the six-month course of 18 Lohan Hands had been reduced to three months, and when I traveled to teach in Australia the course was further reduced to 10 days, and then to 3 days.

    When I first taught in Europe in the 1990s, I taught selection from the 18 Lohan Hands in 8 hours. Students could attain vigorous chi flow by the end of the course. Our teaching methodology continued to improve amazingly, and now we can achieve better results in just 4 hours.

    It may sound presumptuous but I honestly believe that we may now be more cost-effective in the training of 18 Lohan Hands than even the Shaolin monks themselves in the past. Certainly a typical Shaolin Wahnam student now can practice the 18 Lohan Hands more effectively than I did even when I was known as an exemplary student. At that time I just practiced the 18 Lohan Hands, and over time, like a year or two, experienced some chi flow. I believe this also applied to what Shaolin monks in the past did. I did not differentiate between techniques and skills.

    But now our Shaolin Wahnam students can use a same technique from the 18 Lohan Hands to operate different skills. Not only they can generate an energy flow, but also develop internal force, massage internal organs, cleanse their nerves and even expand into the Cosmos – in just one day! It is simply mind-blowing.

    <End>
    "From formless to form, from form to formless"

    26.08.17-28.08.17: Qi Gong Festival with 6 courses in Bern:
    Qiflow-Triple Stretch Method-12 Sinewmetamorphisis-Bone Marrow Cleansing-Zen Mind in Qi Gong

    Website: www.enerqi.ch

  5. #15
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995
    Wonderful! Thank you to Leo for the mindful questions.

  6. #16
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 2 Part 1

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 2 Part 1:

    Question 2

    Sifu, would you kindly share with us which one is, from the 18 Lohan Hands, your favorite one? why? Did you have any "Aha" Experiences while in your own practice and/or teaching them? If so, would you kindly share the one/s that you might consider more relevant?

    Santiago


    Answer,

    Without doubt “Lifting the Sky” is my favorite not only from the 18 Lohan Hands but from all chi kung exercises. This is the chi kung exercise that I practice the most by a big margin from the second.

    When someone asks me which chi kung exercise I have practiced the most, I have no hesitation to answer that it is “Lifting the sky”. If he asks me which exercise I have practiced the second most,, I would have to think hard for an answer. Actually I still haven’t thought out the answer.

    Why is “Lifting the Sky” the one I have practiced the most?

    Historically it was the first chi kung exercise I learned from my Sifu, Sifu Ho Fatt Nam. Rather this was the first exercise I recognized then as chi kung, and performed it correctly.

    On hindsight the first chi kung exercises I learned were the various stances from Uncle Righteousness in Penang taught to me by a siheng, but at that time I practiced them as enduring physical exercise.

    I also learned chi kung exercises from Wuzuquan in Sifu Chee Kim Thong’s school in Dungun, taught to me by his eldest son, Sifu Chee Boon Leong. The whole San Zhan set was chi kung, but I did not derive any chi kung benefit from it, not because of my teacher’s teaching but because of my own ignorance.

    I also learned Abdominal Breathing from my Wuzuquan sihengs, who had much internal force, but I only performed the technique, lacking the skills to develop internal force. I knew then that Abdominal Breathing was chi kung, but I did not succeed in practicing it as chi kung. Without realizing it myself, I practiced it as gentle physical exercise.

    “Lifting the Sky” was the first chi kung exercise that I performed correctly as chi kung. If I remember correctly, it was the first exercise Sifu Ho Fatt Nam taught me, even before teaching me stances. And he taught it to me himself, not delegating it to one of my seniors.

    My sifu did not tell me it was chi kung, neither did I regard it as chi kung. As a good student, I just learned and practiced it dutifully. Indeed my sifu did not tell me anything special about “Lifting the Sky”. All that about “Lifting the Sky” I am going to explain below came later from my own experience, my students’ experiences and my research into chi kung classics.

    I practiced “Lifting the Sky” everyday at the start of my kungfu training, as taught to me by my sifu. This is good confirmation of my advice to students that by following faithfully what the teacher teaches, and not by trying to be smarter than him to add practice material on their own, the students will get the best benefits.

    I did not generate external chi flow movements with “Lifting the Sky” like what we do in Shaolin Wahnam. But there must be internal chi flow, though I was not aware of it at that time, because I obtained a lot of chi kung benefits.

    My migraine and hemorrhoids disappeared without my conscious knowing. I might not be conscious of it then, but “Lifting the Sky” improved my posture, mental clarity and kungfu performance.

    Because of the many benefits that I myself have obtained from it, if I have to teach someone a chi kung exercise, I would inevitably choose “Lifting the Sky”. It was later on hindsight that I listed out why “Lifting the Sky” was my favorite. The reasons are as follows.

    1. It is relatively easy to learn and to practice.
    2. The benefits are many and varied.
    3. The benefits range from the basic to masters’ levels.
    4. At the basic level, it generates an energy flow.
    5. At the most advanced level, it can enable practitioners to attain the highest spiritual fulfillment.
    6. The benefits come relatively quickly.
    7. Even when it is performed wrongly, out of carelessness or forgetfulness, the adverse effects are not serious.
    8. Even when it is performed as gentle physical exercise, the benefits are good, like relaxation, good posture and loosening joints and muscles.

    I did not learn the complete set of 18 Lohan Hands from my sifu. He only taught me “Lifting the Sky”, “Separating Water” and “Big Windmill”, and each exercise was taught to meet the need at the time.

    “Lifting the Sky” was taught to start my kungfu training. I remember my sifu saying, “There is no need for warming up in kungfu. But Lifting the Sky acts like an excellent warming up exercise.”

    “Separating Water” was taught to increase my internal force. “Big Windmill” was taught as part of my Cosmos Palm training.

    (Part 2 follows)
    Last edited by Luo Lang; 31st May 2013 at 08:57 AM.
    "From formless to form, from form to formless"

    26.08.17-28.08.17: Qi Gong Festival with 6 courses in Bern:
    Qiflow-Triple Stretch Method-12 Sinewmetamorphisis-Bone Marrow Cleansing-Zen Mind in Qi Gong

    Website: www.enerqi.ch

  7. #17
    Daniel's Avatar
    Daniel is offline Sifu Daniel Perez - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Spain
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    1,174
    Wow!

    Fantastic answers from Sifu!

    Thank you Sifu, Roland and all of you that have such interesting questions.

  8. #18
    Luo Lang's Avatar
    Luo Lang is online now Sifu Roland Mastel - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zürich-Bern, Switzerland
    Posts
    2,995

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 2 Part 2

    18 Lohan Hands-Answer 2 Part 2

    (Continued from Part 1)


    I once asked my sifu politely whether I could learn the whole set of 18 Lohan Hands. He explained kindly, “18 Lohan Hands were meant to make the Shaolin monks healthy so that they could practice kungfu. You are already very healthy. Focus on your kungfu.” I am grateful for his advice, otherwise I might not have the kungfu attainment I now have.

    I was sentimental over the 18 Lohan Hands because they were the exercises taught by our first patriarch, the great Bodhidharma. So years later after leaving Kuala Trengganu where I learned from Sifu Ho Fatt Nam, I researched extensively and deeply into the 18 Lohan Hands.

    I gathered the 18 exercises I considered the best and formulated them into a set, starting with the widely known set of eight Taoist chi kung exercises known as the Eight Pieces of Brocade.

    Interestingly, the health exercises I practiced as a boy scout, and which were listed in the book, Scouting for Boys, were similar to the eight chi kung exercises in Eight Pieces of Brocade.

    I remetmber I was smiling to myself when I formulated the 18 Lohan Hands, thinking that future critics would point to our 18 Lohan Hands and say, “Hey! Look, these so-called Shaolin chi kung exercises were taken from Taoist chi kung1”

    Image my surprise when later I found in a classic that the same 18 Lohan Hands were recorded in the same order I listed them in our set! I could only attribute this wonderful co-incidence (or was it a co-incidence?) to my tapping into the past during meditation, or more poetically to divine guidance.

    I had a few “Aha” experiences with “Lifting the Sky” and other of the 18 Lohan Hands.

    Aha, I discovered that not only I could generate an energy flow with “Lifting the Sky”, which was the original and usually the main purpose of my practice with this exercise, but also I could build internal force, not only at my arms but all over my body and focus the force at my dan tian.

    Aha, I discovered that I could use “Lifting the Sky” to generate a cosmic shower. Before this, the method I used was Taoist meditation, opening the rush meridian and let energy blossomed out from “baihui” like a fountain, and come down as cosmic shower. This method was called “Opening of Five Petals” and would take years to accomplish. Now, using “Lifting the Sky” or “Carrying the Moon”, I could transmit the skill to students and let them have a cosmic shower in just a one-day course. It was ridiculous but true.

    Aha, in fact I could use “Lifting the Sky” or any chi kung exercise, though “Lifting the Sky” is usually more cost-effective than the others, to accomplish any chi kung skills! Not only the highest kungfu, but also the highest chi kung, is the mind.

    Besides “Lifting the Sky”, I also had a “Aha” experience with the prosaic-looking “Big Windmill”. The “Big Windmill” my sifu, Sifu Ho Fatt Nam, taught me was the forceful “Big Windmill”, not the gentle “Big Windmill” we normally practice in our school.

    This “Aha” experience happened years ago. After performing the forceful “Big Windmill” a few times I felt my arms and palms very powerful. I thought I could try breaking a brick. It broke, and I was very surprised because earlier I spent more than 2 years training Iron Palm from a book but I could not break a brick.

    I thought it could be accidental. I tried a second time, and the brick broke. I tried a third time, and the brick still broke.

    Another “Aha” experience was with “Three Levels to Ground”. At first I did not think highly of this exercise, though in my younger days I practiced it everyday for two years in the Art of Flexibility, and taught it often to people with knee or leg problems to help them recover. I sometimes wondered why I considered it one of the best 18 exercises to be included in the 18 Lohan Hands. It must be divine guidance.

    It was during the UK Summer Camp in 2007 that I broke some tendons at my right knee during a kick. The injury was so back that I could hardly walk up some stairs. I did “Three Levels to Ground” and “Bear Walk”. In two days, my right knee recovered! Suddenly it occurred to me that Bodhidharm is great.


    <End>
    "From formless to form, from form to formless"

    26.08.17-28.08.17: Qi Gong Festival with 6 courses in Bern:
    Qiflow-Triple Stretch Method-12 Sinewmetamorphisis-Bone Marrow Cleansing-Zen Mind in Qi Gong

    Website: www.enerqi.ch

  9. #19
    Adalia's Avatar
    Adalia is offline Sifu Adalia Iglesias - Instructor, Shaolin Wahnam Spain
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    51
    I don' t cease to be amazed at Sifu's answers, so informative and interesting!

    Thank you Sifu!
    Sifu Adalia Iglesias
    Barcelona- Spain
    www.chikung-bcn.com
    chikung.bcn@gmail.com

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    125
    Wow! I am speechless!!!

    Thank you Sigung!!

Similar Threads

  1. Wahnam Cloud Hands Grasp Sparrow Set: 10 Questions to Grandmaster Wong
    By Luo Lang in forum Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit's Special Question & Answer Series
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: 24th August 2015, 03:56 PM
  2. Iron Wire Set: 10 questions to Grandmaster Wong
    By Daniel in forum Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit's Special Question & Answer Series
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 29th March 2015, 01:19 AM
  3. bone marrow cleansing & 18 lohan arts: 10 questions to Grandmaster Wong
    By Daniel in forum Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit's Special Question & Answer Series
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 2nd February 2015, 12:29 AM
  4. 18 Lohan Hands V 18 Shaolin Exercises
    By Marcus in forum Shaolin Chi Kung
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 19th September 2007, 03:08 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •