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10 Questions on "Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Practitioner"

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  • #31
    Two weeks are left for the course - so answer 8 is coming now.

    Thank you Sigung for this fantastic answer!

    Question 8

    In one the Questions & Anwers Series, Sifu once wrote:
    .
    "The saying “nan quan bei tui”, or “Southern Fists Northern Kicks”, typically sums up the main difference between Southern Shaolin Kungfu and Northern Shaolin Kungfu. Southern Shaolin styles are well known for fists, whereas Northern Shaolin styles are well known for kicks...

    ...So another typical difference, besides the use of fists and kicks, is the Northern Shaolin styles are agile and involve a lot of wide movement and open space, whereas Southern Shaolin styles are solid with narrower movement and less space. Many commentators mention that this typical difference is due to the availability of wide, open ground in north China, and crowded narrow lanes in the south."


    - May Sifu share with us if there would be any style that might suit better in a multi-opponent fight or is it just the skill that counts?

    - May Sifu share with us what would the best strategies/patterns/skills/styles be when involved in a multi-opponent fight in a wide and open space? How about in a narrow and closed space?

    Santiago


    Answer

    “Nan quan bei tui” or “Southern Fists Northern Kicks” is traditionally used to describe the difference between Southern Shaolin Kungfu and Northern Shaolin Kungfu, and sometimes between southern styles of Kungfu and northern styles as there are other kungfu styles besides Sothern Shaolin and Northern Shaolin.

    This saying, however, is not universal. There were masters of southern styles who were specialized in kicks, like Fong Sai Yoke and Wong Fei Hoong, and northern masters who specialized in using their hands, like the Taijiquan master, Yang Lu Chan, who specialized in “Grasping Sparrow’s Tail” and the Xingyiquan master, Gua Yun Shen, whose “half a step of crushing fist beats heaven and earth”.

    In a multi-opponent fight, it is the skill of the master that counts, not the kungfu style he practices. If the master is skilful, he can escape any ambush irrespective of the style he practices. If he knows the principles and techniques, like what will be taught in our Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner course, it will be better.

    Nevertheless, certain kungfu styles are more conducive to mass fighting. Choy-Li-Fatt Kungfu and Wing Choon Kungfu are a good contrast. While Choy-Li-Fatt Kungfu is more suitable against multiple opponents, Wing Choon Kungfu is more suitable for masters in solo combat. However, if the masters are skilful and knowledgeable, the Wing Choon master can be good at multiple fighting, and the Choy-Li-Fatt master can be good at advanced solo combat.

    The strategies, patterns and skills that are suitable for multi-opponent fights in wide and open space involve continuously moving about among opponents, like Drunken Eight Immortal Kungfu, movements with wide stances and far-stretching arms, like “Lohan Emerges from Cave”, and talents that focus on mobility and agility.

    On the other hand, strategies, patterns and skills that are suitable for fighting in narrow and closed space involve staying quite stationary at one place, like Chow Ka Kungfu, movements with narrow stances and close-body arms, like “Night Tiger Comes out of Forest”, and abilities that focus on solidness and power.

    Such division, however, is not always true, and there are many examples in kungfu history to illustrate it. Lu Sai Leong, a lady kungfu master, for example, single-handedly fought her way through thousands of imperial guards into the palace to assassinate the Emperor Yung Cheng, who himself was a kungfu master wearing an impenetrable vest, to avenge for the burning of the Shaolin Monastery. It was reputed that Lu Sai Leong later became the famous Ng Mui. Lu Sai Leong was a master of Southern Shaolin, known for powerful, stationary combat, but her fighting through thousands of imperial guards suggested that she must have used a lot of agile movement.

    In more recent times, a kungfu master called Crazy Khun, who was a contemporary of my sifu, Uncle Righteousness, fought his way using a towel from an ambush o kill him at the New Life Plaza in Penang in the early 1990s. Crazy Khun was a Southern Shaolin master, but he must have employed a lot of agile movement in his fight.

    My siheng, Ang Teng, from Sifu Ho Fatt Nam’s lineage, was a specialist of the Monkey style, which belongs to Northern Shaolin, known for agility and movement. He became well known because of a fight against many attackers. He used the tactic of “back-wall battle”, which would be more suited to narrow lanes of closed environment, and fought off all his attackers.

    Hence, although “nan quan bei tui” or “Southern Fists Northern Kicks” is a popular saying, it is the skills and knowledge of the master that counts in multi-opponent combat. We shall be learn these skills and knowledge in the coming “Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner” course.

    <End>
    When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.
    When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.

    -Lao Tzu-

    Comment


    • #32
      Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

      I would like to thank Sifu for another inspiring and fantastic answer. It is so wonderful that Sifu shares his wisdom so openly.

      Thank you Sifu for answering so generously all my questions. :-)

      With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

      Santi

      Comment


      • #33
        Wonderful as always

        Comment


        • #34
          Dear Sifu,

          Thank you for sharing with us more stories of Kung Fu being used in real combat! If the Kung Fu master Crazy Khun was a contemporary of Sigung Lai, I believe he must have been quite elderly when the attack happened in the early 1990s. Quite inspiring!

          Dear Santi,

          Thank you for asking such an important question and bringing benefits to all of us with Sifu's answer

          With Shaolin Salute,
          Lee Wei Joo
          http://shaolinwahnammalaysia.com/

          Comment


          • #35
            Story time - answer 9. Enjoy!


            Question 9

            FJ brought up an interesting story about Sigung Ho and how he fought off a large group of armed attackers with just a spear, and all by himself.

            If I may ask again, Sifu, are there other such amazing stories that you can share with us?

            Sifu Lee Wei Joo


            Answer

            The story of my sifu, Sifu Ho Fatt Nam, fighting off a group of more than 35 attackers was one of the two stories which led me to learn from him.

            The other story was about my siheng, or elder kungfu brother, learning Shaolin Kungfu from my sifu, after my siheng was hand-picked by Korean masters to lead Malaysia in Taekwondo after the Korean masters had left the country. After learning from my sifu for only a short time, probably less than 3 months, my siheng, Yong, whom I had not met before, told Chang, a friend whom I played table-tennis with, that he (Yong) could beat any Taekwondo exponents in the country, except the Korean masters. After a short pause, he told Chang that even the Korean masters, he could beat them.

            At that time, like most combatants, I had much difficulty against Taekwondo kicks. Indeed Taekwondo practitioners often boasted that their kicks were longer and more powerful than Karate punches. Many Shaolin Wahnam students would be surprised at my comments that kicks were easy to counter – after I had learned from Sifu Ho Fatt Nam. At one time I was so good at countering kicks, that opponents dared not kick at me.

            After listening to the two stories of how Sifu Ho Fatt Nam defeated more than 35 attackers, and how my siheng, Yong, could defeat Taekwondo opponents, I decided to learn from my sifu. I rather be a fool for a day, or a year, instead of missing this opportunity.

            Here I shall tell the story of how Shaolin Kungfu came to our school, Shaolin Wahnam.

            When the Shaolin Monastery was burned to the ground by the Qing army (I later learned that it was the Shaolin Monastery at the city of Quanzhou in Fujian Province), our Patriarch, the Venerable Jiang Nan, ran south. After crossing a big river (at first I thought it was Chu Jiang, or the Pearl River, but later found that it was Xi Jiang, or the
            West River), he changed his name to Jiang Nan, which means “South of the River”, so as to escape the notice of the Qing army.

            Jiang Nan was a missionary, and he wanted to pass on the Shaolin arts to only one disciple. After wandering for about 50 years, he could not find a successor. Then one night he found a medicine man, Yang Fatt Khun, demonstrating Fengyang Kungfu, famous for its phoenix-eye fist. My sifu told me that it was in southern Thailand, but I later discovered it was in northern Malaya as a treaty in early 1900s ceded the place to the British who were ruling Malaya at that time.

            Jiang Nan observed Yang Fatt Khun for seven nights. On the 7th night when the crowd had dispersed, when Yang Fatt Khun packed his belongings to go to his hotel, the Shaolin monk approached rthe young man, and said,

            “Many people applauded your kungfu just now, but your kungfu is useless!”

            Before the Yang Fatt Khun could reply, Jiang Nan continued, “Kungfu is for fighting. Let us go back to your hotel and spar.”

            Yang Fatt Khun found the Shaolin monk, who was about 80 then, robust and strong, and his voice sounded like a bell, and his eyes sparkled. When they sparred, Yang Fatt Khun respected the monk’s age, and the young man did not use much force.

            “Spar your best,” the elderly monk commanded.

            But no matter what he did, Yang Fatt Khun found the elderly monk played with him like a child. Yang Fatt Khun himself was good at kungfu. Muay Thai fighters would not allow a medicine man demonstrating kungfu at their place. The young man realized that the elderly monk was a rare kungfu master.

            Yang Fatt Khun knelt before Jiang Nan and begged him to accept Yang Fatt Khun as a student.

            “You must conclude your business, go up a mountain, and start afresh,” commanded Jiang Nan.

            Hence, in our school today, we follow this tradition. No matter how accomplished a student is, he has to start afresh.

            Yang Fatt Khun was my sigung, or teacher’s teacher. He was about 30 when he met Jiang Nan. He was about 70 when he met my sifu.

            My sifu already knew 6 kungfu styles, and he was a professional Muay Thai fighter. He wanted to learn some Shaolin Kungfu to improve his fighting in the ring.

            He heard of an elderly Shaolin master, Yang Fatt Khun, so he begged Yang Fatt Khun to teach him. But each time Yang Fatt Khun declined. My sifu persisted. Finally my sigung told my sifu that he no longer teach.

            When a kungfu master said that he no longer taught, would-be students should not ask further. My sifu thought he had lost the change of learning good kungfu.

            But then a student of Yang Fatt Khun, who was as elderly as the master, told my sifu, “It’s true my sifu does not teach publicly, but we still practice kungfu in private.” He told my sifu where their training place was, and said he would leave the back door open.

            My sifu bought the traditional gift of a cockerel, oranges and a red packet with money inside. At night he went to the training place and true enough he found the back door open.

            He found a few students were training, and my sigung was sitting at an. altar smoking a pipe. Without making any noice, my sifu went to my sigung, knelt down and offered high his traditional gift.

            My sigung took the traditional gift and placed it on the altar, making my sifu very happy.

            “This is destiny,” my sigung said, “and this rascal!”

            I was naïve to ask why my sigung call my sifu a rascal.

            “I was a rascal,” my sifu replied, “because your sigung had to teach me. He was suppose to retire.”
            When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.
            When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.

            -Lao Tzu-

            Comment


            • #36
              Dear Sifu,

              Thank you for your answer to my question, and for telling the story of how Shaolin Kung Fu came to our school, Shaolin Wahnam.

              Thank you, Dimitri, for facilitating this thread.

              If not for the generous deed of Sigung's elderly Siheng, who left the back door open for him to present the gifts to Sitaigung, our school might have turned out quite differently.

              With Shaolin Salute,
              Lee Wei Joo
              Last edited by LeeWeiJoo; 16th November 2018, 04:34 PM.
              http://shaolinwahnammalaysia.com/

              Comment


              • #37
                Here is the answer to FJ's question.

                Question 10

                On the topic of weapons and multiple opponents, what is the approach our Shaolin Arts has on the following:

                1. Using a medium-length staff (up to chest level of the person).
                Would it handle the same like a long staff (person's height or more)? Or has it its own principles for combat?

                2) Using a short-length stick (length of an arm or shorter).
                Does it handle like a sword or a sabre or does it do so differently?

                3) Using a very short blunt-impact weapon (eg. a pen or a torchlight).
                Does it handle like a dagger, though it's not sharp or bladed? Or has it its own principles for combat?

                While I can imagine using a long-range weapon (eg. staff/spear) to fend off groups of attackers, how would the above 3 different weapons be utilized in the same situation to fight off multiple attackers?

                FJ


                Answer

                On the topic of weapons and when we fight multiple opponents, the ideal is to have a lance or a spear to fend off groups of attacks. The practitioner should attack the leader so that the followers would run after seeing their leader down. This is using the tactic of “killing a cockerel to scare away monkeys”.

                The practitioner should make the scene bloody, i.e. hurting the leader so that a lot of blood gash out. The followers would carry the leader and run. The practitioner should not kill the leader, as the followers finding their leader dead, would fight for their lives.

                Using a medium-length staff, which measures up to chest level of a person, would not be ideal. It is not as suitable as a long staff, which measures longer than a person’s height. Even using a long staff is far from ideal as it cannot make a scene bloody. It is better to use a pointed or bladed weapon. If one is not available, the practitioner can capture it from one of the attackers.

                If the attackers do not hold a pointed or a bladed weapon with which the practitioner can wound the leader of the attackers to have a lot of blood gash out, the practitioner should use a staff or any suitable weapon to break an arm or dislocate the elbow of the leader. It is not as bloody as a lot of blood gashing out, but it still can serve the purpose of “killing a cockerel to scare away monkeys” so that the followers can carry the leader to run away.

                When fighting against multiple opponents holding weapons, it is better for the practitioner to use a weapon than to fight unarmed. If the practitioner does not have a weapon, he can capture one, preferably a pointed or a bladed one, from an attacker. We shall learn how to capture a weapon as well as how to fight multiple opponents at the “Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner” course.

                If the multiple opponents are unarmed, it is not as serious, but it is still better for the practitioner to hold a weapon though he can fight them unarmed. If a weapon is not available, he can improvise one, like using a chair or a stick.

                Different weapons have different principles for combat. A pointed weapon like a spear or a lance is used for piercing. A staff is used for hitting. A bladed weapon like a sabre or a big knife is used for cutting.

                But a staff can be used for piercing, or thrusting. Indeed, the Shaolin staff originated from the spear. But to use a stick like a spear or a big knife is incorrect.

                If the practitioner uses a short-length stick, it is worse than a staff. If he uses a short blunt-impact weapon like a pen or a torchlight, it is worst. The purpose of a multi-opponent fight is not to show how skilful the practitioner is with his short-length stick or blunt-impact weapon, but to chase away the attackers without any harm to the practitioner.

                A short-length stick should not be used like a sword or a sable. It should be used differently -- as a short-length stick. In this situation of multiple attack, it is not a suitable weapon.

                It could be a suitable weapon against a fierce dog. If you pierce a dog with a sword, or cut it with a sabre, the dog might be wounded enough to fight for its life. But if you hit it with a half-length stick, it would run away. Live and let live – even for a dog.

                Fighting with a blunt-impact weapon like a pen or a torchlight as if it were a dagger, is incorrect. A dagger is a dagger; it is pointed and sharp edged. A blunt-impact weapon like a pen or a torchlight have neither of these properties. A pen or a torchlight should be used as a pen or a torchlight, like hitting a waiter’s head instead of using your palm with internal force, if the waiter is purposely rude to you.

                <End>
                When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.
                When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.

                -Lao Tzu-

                Comment


                • #38
                  Thank you, Sifu, for taking your precious time to answer our questions so thoroughly and diligently.

                  Thank you, FJ, for asking questions that lead to new insights.

                  I can't help but laugh at the last sentence of Sifu's latest answer to FJ's question

                  With Shaolin Salute,
                  Lee Wei Joo
                  http://shaolinwahnammalaysia.com/

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

                    Amazing answers from Sifu as always. Thank you Sifu for taking the time to answer all of our questions.

                    Yesterday, while reading the Last Answer (Number 10) some new questions came to my mind. Since our dear Dimitri Sijat announced that the time for formulating questions to Sifu is now over, maybe we can have some fun and find the answers all together:

                    - How can we know who the leader is in a group? Sometimes it might be obvious but others might be not.

                    - How can we know who the weakest is in a group? Sometimes it might be obvious but others might be not.


                    I believe that these are very interesting questions (I wonder why I haven't thought of them before!). Especially if we want to apply the two strategies of "Killing a Cockerel to Scare Away Monkeys" and "Break Through the Weakest".

                    In a combat situation, trying to understand as soon as possible who the leader is can be a very useful skill to have. And not only in a combat situation. I believe that this skill can be also very useful in daily life. :-)

                    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

                    Santi




                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Thank you Sifu, for the intriguing....and witty answers! Looking forward to next week :-)

                      Those are good points raised Santi. it did crossed my mind as well, though i haven't given much thought after that.

                      Just for fun to answer your questions:

                      If it was a threat assessment, I'll just look at who is the most aggressive or closest to me.

                      So provisionally speaking, the ''leader'' would be the most aggressive.

                      The weakest would be the one hanging out looking half-committed (however, the leader could also be assessing you from further out too though)


                      I'll add in another food for thought:

                      Since carrying a real lance or a spear is illegal in our modern setting, how would you gain the tactical advantage of having long range weapon (without actually having one and getting into legal trouble)?



                      Cheers,
                      FJ

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Interesting questions Santi!

                        FJ mentioned an interesting point, that of the leader assessing you from further away, or possibly even in hiding, perhaps to launch a surprise attack when least expected. I'm sure this will also be covered in the course.

                        With Shaolin Salute,
                        Lee Wei Joo
                        http://shaolinwahnammalaysia.com/

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Before I catch my flight - answer 11 for Angel.

                          Question

                          This year, in Italy Sifu said that this course will be very good not just for teaching but also for personal development. I felt that Sifu´s statement was far deeper than what i could perceive at that moment but during the preparation process and as the beginning of the course approaches, specially after reading these marvelous answers, I can perceive more clearly how will it be and I´m just amazed. Thank you very much for offering again this wonderful opportunity.

                          My question is if new methods of internal force training will be transmitted during the course and, what benefits will there be in our kung fu development as well in our daily life experience.

                          Angel, Spain


                          Answer

                          This course is very good for both teaching and learning kungfu as well as for personal development and for helping others.

                          As Damian has rightly pointed out, “There is nothing glamorous about fighting.” We want to avoid fighting as best as possible, but if we have to fight, we shall fight well. We want to come out of combat unhurt.

                          But that is not the purpose of many martial artists today. Many martial artists seem to enjoy fighting. They look for fights when they can and they get hurt, sometimes more than their opponents.

                          Why do we train kungfu, any style of kungfu, if we do not want to fight? As I have often mentioned, kungfu training gives us many qualities important for our daily living, like quick reflexes, fast movements, calm disposition, mental clarity as well as good health, vitality and longevity, usually more than what chi kung can provide.

                          Molly also mentions two important points. We learn entering into a chi kung state of mind (called entering Zen in Shaolin Kungfu and entering Tao in Taijiquan) and smiling from the heart. All our students, including those who do not practice Kungfu, learn these two important skills right at the beginning, which is a policy inherited from Sifu Ho Fatt Nam.

                          We also learn chi flow. All these skills – entering into a chi kung state of mind, smiling from the heart and chi flow – are different skills. When one is proficient in one of these skills, he (or she) is not necessarily proficient in the other two. Most people are, in fact, not proficient in any of these skills.

                          It is a very common compliant of most people that they have hundreds of thoughts going into their head and they cannot relax. Having hundreds of thoughts going into their head and being relaxed are two different skills, though they are closely related. One can clear his (or her) mind of all thoughts and still not be relaxed, and vice versa.

                          One has to be in a chi kung state of mind, i.e. he can free his mind of all thoughts and be relaxed at the same time, to practice chi kung. In other words, if he has practiced chi kung for six months, he has freed his mind of all thoughts and be relaxed for six months. Hopefully, and this happens in our students, he can free his mind of all thoughts and be relaxed habitually.

                          When a practitioner smiles from his heart, his heart opens and he becomes happy. Most students in our school know the Chinese word for being happy, which is “kai xin”, which actually means “open heart.” Other people may think our students become happy for no reasons. I recall that when Julia returned to Moscow, some good-meaning friends asked whether there was anything wrong with her as she was often happy for no apparent reasons to her friends. Our students become happy because their hearts open as a result of their smiling from the heart.

                          Our chi flow gives us good health, vitality and longevity besides making us happy and peaceful every day. Not many people know of this fact. Most people think, wrongly, that if they know the techniques of good health, vitality and longevity, and if they practice these techniques long enough they will have the results. To us in Shaolin Wahnam, they know and have practiced the techniques correctly for many years, but they are still sickly and weak because they don’t have the skills to generate a chi flow.

                          To have mental freshness and clarity, to be relaxed, to be happy and to have good health, vitality and longevity are very important in our daily life. Not only we know the philosophy, we have the techniques and skills to gain the results. As we progress, we become more and more skillful.

                          We have many methods of developing internal force. Most kungfu schools have only one or two methods, and understandably they reserve their methods to specially selected disciples. Many martial artists today do not believe in internal force. But we in Shaolin Wahnam know that internal force is true; he know from direct experience.

                          Internal force contributes greatly to good health, vitality, longevity, peak performance and spiritual joys. For those who train kungfu, internal force also contributes to combat efficiency.

                          Internal force is not dependent on gender, age and size. In other words, with internal force a woman can be more forceful than a man, a 60-year old can be more forceful than a 30-year old, a small sized person can be more forceful than a big sized person.

                          In kungfu development being more forceful is obvious. The internal force practitioner also has more stamina and endurance. But what is more important is that internal force contributes greatly in daily life. We may sum up the benefits of internal force as emotional health, peak performance and spiritual joys.

                          In this respect, we are better off than genuine internal force masters in the past. The proverbial examples I offer are Yang Deng Fu of Taijiquan and Gou Yun Shen of Xingyiquan. There is no doubt that both of them were great Kungfu masters with a lot of internal force.

                          Yang Deng Fu was actually the founder of Yang Style Taijiquan, though he generously accredited it to his grandfather, Yang Lu Chan. Yang Deng Fu changed the fast, small movements of Chen Style Taijiquan which Yang Lu Chan practiced to slow, big movements which are characteristic of Yang Style Taijiquan.

                          What many Taijiquan practitioners or dancers today do not know is that Yang Deng Fu suffered for life a palm strike from his father, Yang Jian Hou during free sparring. Yang Deng Fu did not know chi flow which could have overcome his injury. He channeled his internal force for combat, whereas our Shaolin Wahnam family members use internal force to enrich their daily life.

                          Yang Deng Fu also did not live beyond 60. Our family members use their internal force to enhance their longevity.

                          Guo Yun Shen is famous for the kungfu saying, “Ban bu beng quan da tian xia”, which means “half a step of crushing fist strikes heaven and earth”. “Crushing Fist” is one of the five elemental fists of Xingyiquan for which Guo Yun Shen was a master. The forward movement in Three-Body Stance, the main stance in Xingyiquan, is considered “half a step” as a full step would be stepping forward with the back leg.

                          It is reputed that Guo Yun Shen fought with Dong Hai Chuan, the founder of Baguazhang, for three days and three nights, and they ended in a draw. Other sources mention that they did not fight because earlier Guo Yun Shen met Cheng Teng Hua, who was Dong Hai Chuan’s student, who avoided two crushing fists from Gua Yun Shen in a sparring.

                          Guo Yun Shen did not have a happy family life. He was imprisoned for killing an opponent. He did not use his internal force to enrich his life or the lives of other people.


                          Our family members know the three functions of internal force, but Yang Deng Fu and Guo Yun Shen and most other kungfu masters in the past didn’t. The three functions, or three categories of functions, of internal force are (1) to maintain life, (2) to enhance life, and (3) to do anything better. Our Shaolin Wahnam family members use internal force for good health, vitality, longevity, peak performance and spiritual joys.

                          Many new topics will be taught at the “Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner” course from 27th November to 1st December 2018 in Penang. There will not be enough time for internal force training.

                          The course will be interesting and rewarding. But those who attend the course should make arrangement to spend a few days on their own in Penang or elsewhere in Malaysia. Food is very delicious and things are cheap. They should make full use of their currency conversion.

                          <End>
                          When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.
                          When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.

                          -Lao Tzu-

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Dear Sifu,

                            Thank you very much for your deep and nourishing answer.

                            Thank you Dimitri for facilitate the thread, i´m enjoying it so much.

                            Thank you everyone for the wonderful questions and comments.

                            Warm regards,

                            Ángel

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Sigung was so kindly to answer the extra questions.

                              Bonus Questions

                              - How can we know who the leader is in a group?
                              - How can we know who the weakest is in a group?

                              Santi


                              The weakest would be the one hanging out looking half-committed (however, the leader could also be assessing you from further out too though)


                              I'll add in another food for thought:

                              Since carrying a real lance or a spear is illegal in our modern setting, how would you gain the tactical advantage of having long range weapon (without actually having one and getting into legal trouble)?

                              FJ


                              Possibly even in hiding, perhaps to launch a surprise attack when least expected.

                              Sifu Lee Wei Joo


                              Answer

                              We can know who the leader is by observing the group. Usually he is the one giving orders. His followers would look towards him for direction, guidance or help.

                              The weakest person is the one who hesitates or lacking behind. He is often the one who is the most timid.

                              Even if we miss the leader or the weakest, if we aim at the strongest or the weakest, we won’t be too far in our judgment.

                              If the actual leader or the weakest happens to be assessing you from further out, attack the strongest or the weakest in the active group.

                              Carrying a real lance or a spear is illegal. So is an ambush of a group of people attacking you. Capture a long weapon from the group. Helmets, broken bottles, and bicycle chains are often used in group attack. Helmets and broken bottles are not suitable as they are not long reaching enough, but bicycle chains are. Bicycles and cause much hurt to a leader, or frighten the weakest to move away to let you escape.

                              If suitable weapons are not available, attack the leader or the weakest with your bare hands. The purpose is to use the tactic of “catch the leader when catching thieves” or “killing a monkey to scare cockerels”.

                              You must observe “safety first”. If the leader or the weakest happens to be hiding but appears to attack you, he is alone, and you should be able to deal with him easily. You must be ready at all times. If he hesitates, leave him alone and run.

                              <End>
                              When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.
                              When the student is truly ready, the teacher will disappear.

                              -Lao Tzu-

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

                                How wonderful it is to open the forum today and find my extra questions answered by Sifu. :-)

                                Thank you Sifu for always being so generous with all of us and for providing such inspiration for our lives.

                                With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

                                Santi



                                Comment

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