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Quotes from Sifu (Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

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  • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    Please find below another inspiring a beautiful quote from Sifu:

    "Why is it wise and compassionate to forgive? Leaving aside fine points of Cosmic occurrences which actually happen, betrayers may not know whether victims forgive them, but the victims will harm themselves if their response is bad, will be indifferent if their response is indifferent, and will be good if their response is good. It is wise to be good, foolish to harm themselves, and mediocre to be indifferent.

    How do victims harm themselves if their response is bad, if they are angry or want to take revenge against betrayals? The negative energy resulting from their bad response will clock up their natural energy network and bring about illness. In fact, in my many years of chi kung healing, I have discovered that a lot of so-called incurable diseases are due to blocked emotions. Even if the victims are not clinically sick, the energy blockage will affect many aspects of their daily life. Obviously, it is unwise to be sick or to have poor results in daily life.

    When a victim is angry, wants to take revenge or has any manifestations of a bad response to a betrayal, he (or she) not only negates compassion but actively approaches cruelty. It is not just subjective, i.e. cruel people may argue that to be cruel is better than to be compassionate, but cruelty brings harm as it causes energy blockage. Obviously, it is foolish to cause harm to himself.

    On the other hand, leaving aside altruism which we believe in and value highly, wisdom and compassion bring benefits. Indeed, many people have kindly commented that I am wise and compassionate. I owe these desirable qualities to being forgiving." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

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    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi


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    • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

      Please find below another quote from Sifu that I particularly love:

      "There is a scroll hanging at my office showing in Chinese ten greatest attainments in life.

      The greatest wealth is good health.
      The greatest gift is forgiveness.
      The greatest crime is not being filial to parents.
      The greatest shame is to bully others.
      The greatest mistake is to gamble.
      The greatest failure is being vain.
      The greatest stupidity is to take drugs.
      The greatest bankruptcy is loss of hope.
      The greatest admiration is to aim for progress.
      The greatest happiness is to help others.

      Implementing any one of the above teaching per day will surely enrich our daily living." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

      Quote Source and Further Reading



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      With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

      Santi

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      • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

        Please find below another inspiring quote from Sifu:

        "It is significant to note that in the Shaolin teaching, no matter how beautiful or noble the philosophy may be, it is always geared towards practical results. Without practical results, the philosophy is merely hollow words.

        Therefore, Shaolin disciples do not just talk about techniques and internal force, but actually fight well in combat. They do not just talk about energy fields and micro-cosmic flow, but are actually healthy and full of vitality. They do not just talk about the depth of Zen but actually experience spiritual joy." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

        Quote Source and Further Reading


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        With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

        Santi

        Comment


        • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

          Please find below another quote from Sifu that I personally love:

          "There are two main approaches to making a wise decision. For convenience, I call them the rational approach and the intuitive approach, or the approach of the head and the approach of the heart.

          In the rational approach, get a piece or a few pieces of paper. Make three columns, and mark them as headings “Variables”, “Favorable” and “Unfavorable”.

          In the “Variables” column, list down the column variables that affect your decision, like your abilities, interests, aims in life, parents’ aspirations, resources, expected sacrifice, etc. For the “Favorable” column as you consider each variable, write down your assessment ranging from 1 the lowest to 10 the highest. Do the same for the “Unfavorable” column, but ranging from -1 for the least unfavorable to -10 for the most unfavorable.

          Take some time to consider what variables to place in the column. Take some time to consider carefully as you access each variable. How valid your answer will be depends much on how well you prepare and assess the variables.

          Adding up the plus and minus points will give you the answer. Do this carefully only once, and stick with the decision. Don’t make things difficult for yourself by later worrying whether the variables are rightly chosen or intellectualizing whether you should make another assessment.

          It is recommended to perform the intuitive approach early in the morning. Have a good shower and put on some clean clothing. Go into gentle chi flow for a few seconds, then stand upright and be totally relaxed. Smile from the heart, and in tune yourself with the Cosmos. While in a chi kung state of mind, ask God, the Buddha, Guan Yin Bodhisattva, the Cosmos or whatever name you call the Supreme for a clear answer to your questions.

          Prepare your questions beforehand so that you will not be hesitant or forgetful when asking the questions. Do not have too many questions. Three or four will be a good choice. Make your questions as specific as possible so that you have no ambiguity of how to act on the answers.

          Follow the answers to your questions even if they are not what you expect. Eventually, you will find they are the best answers.

          Choose either the rational or the intuitive approach, and act on the decision. Leave all your worries or doubts behind and move on courageously whatever direction you have chosen according to your decision." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

          Quote Source and Further Reading


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          With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

          Santi

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          • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

            Please find below another beautiful and inspiring quote from Sifu:

            "Following the heart is in harmony with the flow of the Cosmos.

            You don't have to be everything everyone needs you to be. Other people have no right to make this demand. It is sufficient that you are the best person you can be. This in fact is more than needed. What is needed is that one becomes a good person." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

            Quote Source and Further Reading


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            With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

            Santi

            Comment


            • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

              Please find below another quote that I love from Sifu:

              "In chi kung, breathing is categorized into two broad types called wen xi and wu xi , or “scholars' breathing” and “warriors' breathing”. Scholars' breathing is gentle whereas warriors' breathing is forceful but not forced.

              Scholars' breathing is useful for quiet activities, such as meditation and intellectual work. Warriors' breathing is useful for vigorous actions, like combat and sports.

              Breathing out through the nose is usually adopted for scholars' breathing. With the mouth gently close the rate of breathing can be slowed down tremendously, resulting in a deep, gentle breath that is conducive to mental focus and serenity.

              Breathing out through the mouth is generally used for warriors' breathing. With the mouth open it is more efficient in disposing off the toxic waste produced by vigorous actions.

              When force is exerted such as in a strike, the exponent not only breathes out through the mouth but gives a shout, not so much for scaring the opponent but for exploding internal force. By using appropriate sounds, a skillful exponent can channel internal force from relevant parts of his body.

              For example, by using the sound “her-it” he can generate internal force from the qi-hai (abdominal energy field) for a powerful punch or palm strike; by using the sound “yaaaah” he can generate energy from his tan-choong (thoracic energy field) for a forceful tiger claw.

              If a martial artist habitually closes his mouth when exerting forceful strikes or kicks, some force may bounce back and become locked, usually at the chest or backbone, causing internal injury. I have treated a few martial artists, some of them are third and fourth dan blackbelts, for this problem.

              While most martial artists of other styles do not pay attention to their breathing, which is a crucial factor in energy management, the Chinese masters have developed breath control to a very high level. There are seven types of breathing — not just two. They are in Cantonese pronunciation :“fu”, “kap”, “piai”, “shui”, “jeng”, “hot”, “fong”. “Fu” is breathing out, “kap” breathing in, “piai” holding the breath, “shui” letting the breath flow out spontaneously, “jeng” quietening the breath, “hot” exploding the breath, “fong” releasing the breath.

              By employing these various breathing modes in suitable combinations, a kungfu master enhances his stamina, force, agility, stability, judgment, responses and decision making. For example, when observing an opponent he would take a deep breath into his abdomen and adopt the “jeng” mode of breathing. If he has to jump up or away, he would take in a quick breath to his chest “to be as light as a feather”, and as he lands he would use the “fong” mode to lower his remaining breath to his abdomen “to be as solid as a mountain”

              If he has to make a series of movements, such as fighting a gang, he would take in a gentle breath, employ the “shui” mode while executing many fast attacks, and complete the cour de grace on the gang leader with the “hot” mode — all in one long breath. This is one of many reasons why while many other martial artists may be panting for breath after ten minutes of action, a kungfu master is still fresh and relaxed after sparring for an hour". - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

              Quote Source and Further Reading


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              With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

              Santi

              Comment


              • Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

                Please find below another beautiful quote from Sifu:

                "Basically, I find life is a joy. Everyday is our birthday. But we need to know how to find the joys and beauties of life, and realize that there is also a lot of suffering. We need to know the limits of our abilities. There is much suffering and injustice that are beyond our control. If we can right wrongs, we would do so, but we can still find the joys of life despite its sufferings. This principle is in line with the teaching of Zen, that Zen practitioners can live in societies without being contaminated by societies.

                An important ability to find the joys of life is to find joys in our daily duties. Our daily duties are not only joyful, but also beautiful. You are more likely to find joys and beauties in your work if you appreciate the truth that the job you do provides you the source to feed yourself and your family if you have one, as well as to provide a roof above your head at night. If you are a boss, appreciate the truth that the people who work for you, provide you a comfortable life.

                When you return home, appreciate the fact that your wife or husband is not the person who just happened to marry you, but is the person who sacrifices the best part of her or his life for your well being. If you are not married, it is time to get a good husband or a good wife. There are literally thousands of men and women around you. You just have to make a good choice." - Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

                Quote Source and Further Reading


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                With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

                Santi

                Comment

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