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I really believe one hour of Horse stance is the foundation

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  • I really believe one hour of Horse stance is the foundation

    Whether its San Zhan, Iron Wire, OFSZ or Eighteen Lohan Art, you need the stored effort to be successful in fighting and/or Cultivation (capital C).

    What do my brothers and sisters think? I'm genuinely interested to know,

    Thanks family,

    Sham.

  • #2
    Excellent foundation for kungfu
    Damian Kissey
    Shaolin Wahnam Sabah , Malaysia .
    www.shaolinwahnamsabah.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Indeed, even at the physical level of strengthening the muscles and tendons success in stance training will prevent training injuries later, especially in the hips, knees, and ankles.
      Shaolin Wahnam USA

      "Every morning you are born again. What you do today is the most important thing".

      Comment


      • #4
        Time is only one factor. Whether or not an hour is "required" depends on numerous factors such as quality, aims and objectives. In our current day and age, one hour is too much for most people. Our Kung Fu should enhance our lives and we should not become slaves to it.
        Sifu Andrew Barnett
        Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland - www.shaolin-wahnam.ch

        Flowing Health GmbH www.flowing-health.ch (Facebook: www.facebook.com/sifuandrew)
        Healing Sessions with Sifu Andrew Barnett - in Switzerland and internationally
        Heilbehandlungen mit Sifu Andrew Barnett - in der Schweiz und International

        Chi Kung Courses: May 2019 in Landquart CH
        QEA Discussion Forum: www.qea.ch/forum

        Comment


        • #5
          My brother Andrew Sihieng, thank you for your insightful reply. Would you be willing to share your experience in developing tremendous internal force (which of course involves a powerful mind) via stance training? I know all martial arts rely on solid stances and dependable footwork. And you have lots of both.

          Yes time is definitely a factor, but when i've trained with MMA fighters, my experience has been they spend close to three hours a day on training. I personally know BJJ and Muay Thai hobbyists and amateur fighters who train the same amount. All of these people work 40 hours a week, have a girlfriend and some even study at college too. My thought is: what excuse do most people have?

          Damian Siheng, I really need to come to splendid Sabah again and if you are willing, to train with you. It would be a privilege for me.

          Hello to you my brother David, I also need to train with you. Chin-Na.

          At the start of ones KungFu training its ideal not necessary but ideal, to aim for a one hour horse stance (As Siheng mentioned its not necessarily an exact number, but in my observation a good place to aim for). If sustained the depth attained, in my experience is that the Zen mind becomes very deep, your body becomes strong (including ankles, very good observation David) and foot work (which is incredibly important) excels.

          Best wishes to you all.
          Last edited by Shamsher; 20th November 2019, 05:20 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Shamsher View Post
            Yes time is definitely a factor, but when i've trained with MMA fighters, my experience has been they spend close to three hours a day on training. I personally know BJJ and Muay Thai hobbyists and amateur fighters who train the same amount. All of these people work 40 hours a week, have a girlfriend and some even study at college too. My thought is: what excuse do most people have?
            I spend on average 11 hours per week on my dance training (closer to 20 hours when you factor in travel), while maintaining a 40+ hour a week job and I can tell you it is not so easy. Already I have to give up on many things that other people consider part of normal life. My girlfriend also does the same or it would be even harder. I think one should avoid making judgements about other people's abilities to manage themselves - different people are at different stages of development.

            Admiring exceptional people and aspiring to grow is a great thing, but unreasonable expectations can be detrimental to one's progress. It is better to really establish a shorter but consistent daily practice and really enjoy doing that. In time, it may well grow into something more, but better not force it too much with will.
            George / Юра
            Shaolin Wahnam England

            gate gate pāragate pārasaṁgate bodhi svāhā

            Comment


            • #7
              Great post, George. I currently work an average of 45-55 hours a week (often much more), in addition teach a Kung Fu class, some Chi Kung courses, perform some treatment sessions and run the accounts for my practice. Oh yes ... forum, 3 websites, ..... I also have a wonderful family and other interests I enjoy pursuing.

              In the early days of my Kung Fu practice, I would mostly practice 1-2 hours a day - more at the weekends, less during the week. The practice was split into two sessions - the morning sessions was 15-45 minutes of force training (stances, moving in stances, moving in stances with basic patterns, etc.) and the remainder was on sequences, sets and other specific skills, aims or objectives. The evening session was mostly specific training depending on where I was in my training at the time. It was almost always the shorter of the two sessions (15-45 minutes in total).

              Nowadays, my priorities no longer allow nor require this intensity. As George succinctly noted
              It is better to really establish a shorter but consistent daily practice and really enjoy doing that.
              . My daily training is now mostly much shorter and more focused on specific aims and objectives.

              Maybe also to note: I don't train Kung Fu to be a fighter, but to develop skills and abilities to enhance and improve my health, my life, my work and my "play". If I were training "just" to be a fighter, my training may be different.
              Sifu Andrew Barnett
              Shaolin Wahnam Switzerland - www.shaolin-wahnam.ch

              Flowing Health GmbH www.flowing-health.ch (Facebook: www.facebook.com/sifuandrew)
              Healing Sessions with Sifu Andrew Barnett - in Switzerland and internationally
              Heilbehandlungen mit Sifu Andrew Barnett - in der Schweiz und International

              Chi Kung Courses: May 2019 in Landquart CH
              QEA Discussion Forum: www.qea.ch/forum

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Andrew View Post
                Nowadays, my priorities no longer allow nor require this intensity. As George succinctly noted . My daily training is now mostly much shorter and more focused on specific aims and objectives.

                Maybe also to note: I don't train Kung Fu to be a fighter, but to develop skills and abilities to enhance and improve my health, my life, my work and my "play". If I were training "just" to be a fighter, my training may be different.
                Couldn't agree with this more. Were I training to be a fighter, my training priorities would be different. It's important to me that my practice: 1.) reflects my aims and objectives 2.) remains consistent 3.) is joyful. 1-2 hours a day was fine when it was only me, working 40 hours a week and maintaining a tiny apartment. Now it's 40+ hours a week, off-site travel for work, stuff that goes along with owning a home, teaching two classes a week, making time for my husband and our marriage, maintaining my website, blog, marketing, etc. With my current aims and objectives, my practice enhances all of those things in a positive way, so I'm sticking with that.

                All the best,

                Molly

                有志著事竟成

                Shaolin Wahnam Twin Cities

                Genuine Shaolin Kungfu and Qigong in Minnesota
                https://www.shaolinwahnamtc.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Shamsher View Post
                  when i've trained with MMA fighters, my experience has been they spend close to three hours a day on training. I personally know BJJ and Muay Thai hobbyists and amateur fighters who train the same amount.
                  Originally posted by Andrew View Post
                  If I were training "just" to be a fighter, my training may be different.
                  Yes this is an important point. I think anyone seriously considering taking part in free-sparring competitions would be, at best, unwise if they were to think that they could do so without putting in this level of commitment to their training.

                  And this training would have to include a lot more than just stance training, even though that is very important of course. But an hour of Golden Bridge a day would probably be a nice contribution - I'll have to get back to you on that when I get there.

                  But with this one must really be careful with over-training. Slow, steady and consistent improvement is definitely the safer choice.
                  Last edited by George; 21st November 2019, 07:17 PM.
                  George / Юра
                  Shaolin Wahnam England

                  gate gate pāragate pārasaṁgate bodhi svāhā

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by George View Post
                    I think one should avoid making judgements about other people's abilities to manage themselves - different people are at different stages of development.
                    Well said George!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by George View Post



                      Yes this is an important point. I think anyone seriously considering taking part in free-sparring competitions would be, at best, unwise if they were to think that they could do so without putting in this level of commitment to their training.
                      I'm glad you mention this, it is important that we be realistic about the outcomes of our various levels of commitment.

                      Shaolin Wahnam USA

                      "Every morning you are born again. What you do today is the most important thing".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One hour in Horse Riding Stance may be challenging. In our case its more about body ability to take that much energy generated every single day. It gives really nice and deep results, and the feeling of "not wearing" a physical body, if done correctly.
                        Finding time for the practice? well, its all about priorities. If one really decides to go for it, why not start 4 am? Even if you start work at 7 there is still plenty of time to practice. Chi kung gives tons of extra energy, which mean the need of sleep can be reduced.

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                        • #13


                          If you can remain comfortable in the Horse ridding Stance for an hour, congratulations! that takes allot of commitment. And no doubt have a BIG reflection on your daily life achievements.

                          I once herd it mentioned that, a student was still at the beginning stage of development when he/she could reach 1hr in Horse ridding stance ! Of course this depends on your aims and objectives and your reference.

                          Regardless of your aims and objectives, Im not sure its necessary , however I believe its a noble goal.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Shamsher View Post
                            Whether its San Zhan, Iron Wire, OFSZ or Eighteen Lohan Art, you need the stored effort to be successful in fighting and/or Cultivation (capital C).

                            What do my brothers and sisters think? I'm genuinely interested to know,

                            Thanks family,

                            Sham.
                            To be a successful fighter you need to fight

                            Comment

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