Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do we transfer our chi kung or kungfu practice to enrich our daily life?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do we transfer our chi kung or kungfu practice to enrich our daily life?

    Dear Brothers and Sisters,

    There are many aspects of our lives that have and can be enriched by practicing our chi kung and kung fu. Consider the following categories:

    Family
    Spiritual
    Work
    Sports/Physical Activities
    Creativity
    Education
    Social Life
    Health
    Finance
    Problem Solving

    How does our chi kung and kung fu enrich our lives in any one of, several, or all of these life aspects?
    少林華南台灣 Shaolin Wahnam Taiwan

    Facebook

    "Then how could chi kung overcome diseases where the cause is unknown or when there is no cure? The question is actually incorrect. The expressions "the cause is unknown" and "there is no cure" are applicable only in the Western medical paradigm. The expressions no longer hold true in the chi kung paradigm. In the chi kung paradigm the cause is known, and there is a cure."

    -Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

  • #2
    How can Chi Kung help us in our daily life?

    Dear Mark Sihing,

    Thank you for this beautiful question.

    My answer is in a million of different ways

    For instance for creativity, when I am in a chi kung state of mind my sumi-e paintings are much more beautiful.

    Always smile from the heart.
    Attached Files
    .•´¯`•.¸¸.•´¯`°irene°´¯`•.¸¸. ´¯`•.

    ---------------------------------------
    “I wish I could show you when you are lonely or in darkness the astonishing light of your own being.”
    Hafiz

    Comment


    • #3
      Dear Irina,

      That is indeed a beautiful painting!

      With Shaolin Salute,
      Lee Wei Joo
      http://shaolinwahnammalaysia.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Dear Mark,

        Thank you for starting this discussion.

        Family
        Spiritual
        Work
        Sports/Physical Activities
        Creativity
        Education
        Social Life
        Health
        Finance
        Problem Solving
        These are interesting topics!

        I'd like to start with "Problem Solving". I have my 'favourite' and 'neutral' patterns (this includes sequences and sets etc) that I practice. The difference between these two categories is that I don't have to think at all with the 'favourite' ones (the chi just flows), and for the 'neutral' ones there is a measure of awkwardness or hesitation that is still present. Some of the training time is spent on gently working with 'neutral' patterns so that they graduate over to the 'favourite' category. This transition takes time and consistent training. If I were to change neutral pattern A for neutral pattern B on Day 2, and then neutral pattern B for neutral pattern C on Day 3, and neutral pattern D on Day 4 for neutral pattern E, and so on and so forth, then it would take a long time for neutral pattern A to become favourite pattern A. I have come to realize that working on neutral pattern A for short periods every day until it has made the transition to favourite pattern A is actually more expedient than jumping hastily on to B, C, or D and not achieving excellence with any.

        I should mention that this is a personal thing, and I expect other practitioners will have other ways of going about their training very successfully. But I hope that the above example illustrates how I came to experience that 'training one thing at a time' is a way of 'starting later, arriving earlier', and more pertinently, a way of solving a given 'problem'.

        In life, I have learnt to take the same principle and apply it. If there is a 'problem' that I wish to solve, after careful consideration, I may choose to apply a given method. I will carry out that method to the end to see if it has worked or not. If it hasn't, then I may switch to another method. But generally, I try to stick to the first method until it has been completed so that I can make a fair assessment as to whether or not it worked to solve the problem.

        A simple example would be trying to arrive at Yonge and Bloor (a major intersection in Toronto city) at an earlier time so that I can be ready and prepared for an appointment at 6pm. So that would be the 'problem'. I might research what methods of transportation there are and calculate roughly that going by car during rush hour is slower than going by the TTC subway. So I might take the subway and discover that I do arrive earlier, but that I don't feel 'ready' or 'prepared' for the appointment because of the 'sardine-like' crowdedness on the train. Having implemented the method and ascertained that it does not produce the desired result, I would consider driving by car even earlier to avoid the rush hour, sit in a nice cafe and have a tea, and then walk the short stretch to arrive at the appointment 'ready' and 'prepared' at 5:45pm.

        The success of this outing would form the basis for other calculations for trips to the nearby area. It would also form an extended foundation for calculations for trips to areas that are further away, i.e. driving by car much earlier to have the time to be at a venue in advance is a good way to be 'ready' and 'prepared' (part of the Shaolin principle of Four Preparations!).

        Thanks again for starting the thread, Mark. Looking forward to posting again, and to reading what others have to say!

        All the best,

        Emiko
        Emiko Hsuen
        www.shaolinwahnam.jp
        www.shaolinwahnam.ca

        INTENSIVE & SPECIAL COURSES -- PENANG 2018
        Taught by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit
        4th generation successor of the Southern Shaolin Monastery
        Small and Big Universe Course: Nov 21 to 25
        Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner: Nov 26 to Dec 2
        Cultivating Spirit Nourishing Energy: Dec 2 to Dec 8
        Intensive Chi Kung Course: Dec 9 to Dec 13
        To apply, send email to: secretary@shaolin.org

        Comment


        • #5
          Dear Mark,
          thank you for starting this thread. This is a very important topic for me.

          When i started practicing our shaolin arts, I had my training times twice a day. And the rest of the day was my "normal life".
          After each training session I felt very good and energetic, but soon after training I changed into my old habits and mindset.
          So during this time I missed out on the experience that my practice can enhance my daily life.
          Later on, my life became very busy. I had less time for training and was very sad about it.
          I remembered my Sifus words about being mindful in our daily life, observing ourselves and relaxing whenever we feel we are tensed.
          Because i had not much time for regular training sessions, I started to transfer my training into my daily life.
          I tried to focus on being mindful to myself and others, opened my heart and relaxed my body and mind when i felt tensed.
          When life went busy, I tried to stay focused on the moment without worrying and without intellectualizing.
          I tried to change my mindset by thinking positive most of the time, tried to be mindfull and compassionate to others and keeping my ego low.
          Of course acting by our shaolin laws was also important.
          Unfortunately i often failed and went back to old habits.
          Later i figured out, that with regular force training like "golden bridge" it was much easier to transfer my practice into daily life.
          I experienced that I had more energy to stay on track.
          From then on, my practice had a very big impact on enriching my daily life.

          Looking back now, I think a big mistake from me, was to divide my practice into training sessions and regular live, expecting that my life will change by itself just by doing regular training sessions.
          Nowadays, it's very important for me to deepen the skills in my daily training session. But it's just as important to apply those in everyday life to enrich daily life.

          For me, the most useful skills for daily life are " opening my heart and smiling from the heart", "relaxing my mind and body" to keep the chi flowing
          and "building up energy" to maintain everything.
          So by applying these skills in my daily life it enriches it in every aspect you mentioned. I can't remember any difficult situation in the past years that i couldn't solve.
          I have a good relationship to my family, a good job. I enjoy my life...

          Thanks to the past masters, Sigung and Sifu :-)
          May all beings be happy!

          Comment


          • #6
            For me, Hands down, the skills of relaxing and of smiling from the heart are the most important, and are indispensable.

            Bam!

            Cha!
            Charles David Chalmers
            Brunei Darussalam

            Comment


            • #7
              Dear Family, dear Charles,

              For me, Hands down, the skills of relaxing and of smiling from the heart are the most important, and are indispensable.
              So true! I love to be reminded of these treasures!

              From the heart,

              Emiko
              Emiko Hsuen
              www.shaolinwahnam.jp
              www.shaolinwahnam.ca

              INTENSIVE & SPECIAL COURSES -- PENANG 2018
              Taught by Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit
              4th generation successor of the Southern Shaolin Monastery
              Small and Big Universe Course: Nov 21 to 25
              Becoming a Shaolin Wahnam Kungfu Practitioner: Nov 26 to Dec 2
              Cultivating Spirit Nourishing Energy: Dec 2 to Dec 8
              Intensive Chi Kung Course: Dec 9 to Dec 13
              To apply, send email to: secretary@shaolin.org

              Comment


              • #8
                And of course, in addition to relaxing and smiling from the heart, there is the great skill of letting go.

                In the household, letting go of junk is a good, practical example.


                Still Yours,


                Charles
                Charles David Chalmers
                Brunei Darussalam

                Comment

                Working...
                X