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Effects of Chi Kung on mood and anxiety

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  • Ronny
    replied
    What I meant was not financial profit. I'm sorry, I wasn't clear. What I meant is that there are so many studies which proof that qi gong brings health benefits but a the end there are just the studies lying there, no steps are made to make practical use of these studies except a of a few practitoners (compared to the whole world population) who get benefits from their qi gong training.

    I hope one day the big mass population (or at least a certain percentage of it) will train qi gong and they will get health benefits from it.

    In short: studies are welcome but if nobody (i. e. the mass population) trains, they are worthless.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Langford
    replied
    Originally posted by yeniseri View Post
    Yangshenggong (qigong) is not an activity that lends itself to profit. That is against its background but one can surely live the training in positive ways reflective of ones 'roots'.
    I guess I'm imagining the many profitable benefits I am getting.

    prof·it·a·ble/ˈpräfitəbəl/Adjective:
    • (of a business or activity) Yielding profit or financial gain.
    • Beneficial; useful.


    Originally posted by yeniseri View Post
    One cannot sell stuff lke that but it can be sold with deception as the modus operandi of marketing. Nothing wrong with healing and health!
    Deception? I don't understand one bit what you are trying to say.

    Leave a comment:


  • yeniseri
    replied
    Originally posted by Ronny View Post
    There are so many studies about qi gong I wonder where does it ultimately leads to. Will people ever profit from qi gong on a grand scale?
    Yangshenggong (qigong) is not an activity that lends itself to profit. That is against its background but one can surely live the training in positive ways reflective of ones 'roots'. One cannot sell stuff lke that but it can be sold with deception as the modus operandi of marketing. Nothing wrong with healing and health!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ronny
    replied
    There are so many studies about qi gong I wonder where does it ultimately leads to. Will people ever profit from qi gong on a grand scale?

    Leave a comment:


  • James L
    replied
    Hi Barry, this is great!
    With regards to Chi Kung healers this is a good account for us to use as some extra external evidence to validate what we do.

    Best Wishes
    James

    Leave a comment:


  • elise lorraine
    replied
    effects of chi kung on mood and anxiety

    Hi Barry, I finally got going on the Forum! Very interesting to read about this study, I'd like to know more, like over what period it was carried out and stuff. Anyway, hope to be able to get together when I'm in UK sometime - or are you planning to come over here? Mark is here at the moment so I can catch up on Fully alive news, and have a great massage of course!
    Thanks for this,
    Elise

    Leave a comment:


  • Fabienne
    replied
    Dear Sisook

    Oh my, it certainly feels very, very good to read such statements!
    Thank you for brightening up my already excellent day even more !

    Shaolin greetings
    Fabienne

    Leave a comment:


  • barrys
    started a topic Effects of Chi Kung on mood and anxiety

    Effects of Chi Kung on mood and anxiety

    Another recent trial on the effects of Chi Kung

    Psychosocial stress may lead to increased rates of anxiety and depression. Aerobic exercise and mind-body therapies are frequently described as having positive effects on psychological well-being by enhancing mood and reducing anxiety. Few studies, however, have investigated the acute psychological effects of qigong exercise. Fifty-nine regular qigong exercisers (mean age 50.8 years) were randomized to a Qigong or Control group. Pre- and postmeasurements were then compared. POMS-Depression, Anger, and Fatigue, and STAI-State Anxiety scores decreased significantly in the Qigong group but not in the Control group. Results thereby suggest that qigong exercise can produce desirable psychological effects, and Qigong exercise may therefore be included among other activities performed to boost resistance to daily stressors. (C) 2011 by the American Psychological Association

    Acute Effects of Qigong Exercise on Mood and Anxiety.
    Johansson, Mattias; Hassmen, Peter; Jouper, John

    Sport, Exercise, & Performance Psychology. 1(S):60-65, August 2011
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