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  • rodrigo
    replied
    Originally posted by sancrica View Post
    Another questions that popped in my mind were the following:

    If we refer to Wudang Taijiquan/Kung Fu as Shaolin Kung Fu, does the Taijiquan taught at our school refer more to, for example, the Chen and Yang styles? Are the 12 sequences from our syllabus taken from Chen and Yang styles? Does anybody know the philosophy and history behind the 12 sequences of Wahnam Taijiquan?
    I asked that once, and IIRC the answer is that Wahnam Taijiquan is a "mix" of Chen, Yang and Wudang styles. But I might be remembering incorrectly

    Leave a comment:


  • sancrica
    replied
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    Originally posted by Angel Guillermo View Post
    Dear Santi,

    Thanks so much for your contribution to this conversation. I am glad that it had inspired you to further your inquiry and understanding of Wudang Kungfu.
    Thank you Sidai for your kind words. It was very kind of you to have started this thread. I am sure that many people are benefiting from it.

    Originally posted by Angel Guillermo View Post
    So to comment on your latest question: Here are my thoughts. Altough it is not directly mentioned, rotation of the waist is implied on the "Focusing Spirtit Accumulating Energy Treatise in Grand Ultimate" by Imortal Zhang San Feng. Specificaly on a section called "No Two Door" which means "Gate of No Other Way". Here, Immortal Zhang San Feng mention "Ten Essentials in Wudang Kungfu Practice" and emphasized that there were no other way to practice Wudang Kungfu.
    Thank you Sidai for sharing more about the Treatise. Isn't it amazing and wonderful that Sifu has translated it for all of us? So many secrets contained on it! What a privilege it is and how generous Sifu always is with all of us.

    Originally posted by Angel Guillermo View Post
    Luckily for you, others and myslef, we might have an excellent opportunity to learn and gain tremendous insight from Sifu, on this NO TWO DOOR: Ten Essential on Wudan Kungfu, next year in the beautiful island of Puerto Rico...
    Looking forward to the details of this excellent opportunity on Puerto Rico. It sounds amazing!

    Originally posted by Angel Guillermo View Post
    Looking forward to more interesting questions and comments during the course of this conversation.
    Another questions that popped in my mind were the following:

    If we refer to Wudang Taijiquan/Kung Fu as Shaolin Kung Fu, does the Taijiquan taught at our school refer more to, for example, the Chen and Yang styles? Are the 12 sequences from our syllabus taken from Chen and Yang styles? Does anybody know the philosophy and history behind the 12 sequences of Wahnam Taijiquan?

    Thank you all for sharing your thoughts on this very interesting thread.

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    NO TWO DOOR: Ten Essentials on Wudang Kungfu

    Originally posted by sancrica View Post
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,



    Thank you Nessa Sije for sharing your beautiful story. It is always inspiring to read how family members connect with these wonderful arts.



    Thank you Olli Sijat for your contribution.

    Angel Sidai posted the other day on Facebook a very interesting article from Sifu explaining "The Benefits of Taijiquan on Shaolin Kung Fu". I am sure that many of you have already read it.

    There was one part of Sifu's article that I didn't know:



    If you are interested on reading the full article, you can find it here.

    So, that led me to another question. Does Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu emphasize waist rotation? I would love to hear your thoughts on this.

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi
    Dear Santi,

    Thanks so much for your contribution to this conversation. I am glad that it had inspired you to further your inquiry and understanding of Wudang Kungfu. From the same artcicle you just quoted you also can find Sifu's explanation to the dilema that prompted this conversation:

    Wudang Taijiquan was special. It was the closest to Shaolin Kungfu. In fact it was the climax of Shaolin Kungfu, and was actually called Wudang Shaolin Kungfu. But the Wudang Taijiquan Set that I reconstructed from classical sources was very long because I did not want to miss out anything important.
    So to comment on your latest question:

    So, that led me to another question. Does Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu emphasize waist rotation? I would love to hear your thoughts on this.
    Here are my thoughts. Altough it is not directly mentioned, rotation of the waist is implied on the "Focusing Spirtit Accumulating Energy Treatise in Grand Ultimate" by Imortal Zhang San Feng. Specificaly on a section called "No Two Door" which means "Gate of No Other Way". Here, Immortal Zhang San Feng mention "Ten Essentials in Wudang Kungfu Practice" and emphasized that there were no other way to practice Wudang Kungfu. You can check the links but I will enumerate them for your convenience.

    The Ten Essentials in Wudang Kungfu Practice:

    1. Empy your mind of all thoughts
    2. Do not tense any muscles
    3. Loosen your waist
    4. Principle of false-real
    5. Principle of sinkng and pressing
    6. Using intention and not using strengh
    7. Co-ordination of top and bottom
    8. Integration of internal and external
    9. One gentle, graceful flow whithout any break
    10. Movement in stillness, stillness in movement

    And like I stated before, I am convinced that Sifu's aha moments during his Wudang Kungfu training had came about do to his natural progression in Shaolin Kunfu practice, the same way Immortal Zhang San Feng did.

    Luckily for you, others and myslef, we might have an excellent opportunity to learn and gain tremendous insight from Sifu, on this NO TWO DOOR: Ten Essential on Wudan Kungfu, next year in the beautiful island of Puerto Rico...

    Looking forward to more interesting questions and comments during the course of this conversation.

    Best Wishes,
    Angel

    Leave a comment:


  • sancrica
    replied
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    Originally posted by Nessa View Post
    Dear family,

    Thank you raising such interesting questions.

    Dear Santi, you asked: Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?

    If I would have to choose one over the other, I would choose Shaolin Kungfu. Why? Because within Shaolin Kungfu are all kungfu styles.

    When I was 14 years old I tried martial arts for the first time. I started with Aikido. I liked it a lot, but since I was in my teenage years, my attention span was rather short. I also tried boxing and other western styles, but I didn’t quite feel at home with any of them...
    Thank you Nessa Sije for sharing your beautiful story. It is always inspiring to read how family members connect with these wonderful arts.

    Originally posted by understanding View Post
    The essence of all martial arts is combat efficiency, hence the Essence of Shaolin concerns the best combat techniques of the greatest martial art. As it happens, this essential skill of combat efficiency can be trained and taught in many levels, from total beginners to marvellous application. Sigung also made a point to mention that the Essence of Shaolin is a pattern-set without having directly arranged combat sequences of its own, so the combat applications are made the finest essence...
    Thank you Olli Sijat for your contribution.

    Angel Sidai posted the other day on Facebook a very interesting article from Sifu explaining "The Benefits of Taijiquan on Shaolin Kung Fu". I am sure that many of you have already read it.

    There was one part of Sifu's article that I didn't know:

    I also discovered and had aha experiences how Taijiquan could enrich Shaolin Kungfu. If a student was rigid in his movement, by practicing his Shaolin sequences as if he was performing Taijiquan, he could not only overcome his rigid problem but make his movements flowing.

    I discovered two important reasons why a small-sized Taijiquan exponent could defeat a bigger-sized opponent. One reason was internal force. The other reason was Taijiquan mechanics, and the core of Taijiquan mechanics was waist rotation. By rotating the waist, many Shaolin techniques that were otherwise difficult to perform, became easy.

    Waist rotation led to fa-jing, or exploding force. The Taijiquan principle of “starting from the back leg, rotating the waist and ending at the hand” became very useful. By applying the principle of rotating the waist, I could help Shaolin students not only to explode spiral force, such as in “Black Tiger Steals Heart”, but make their palm strikes powerful, realizing the Shaolin principle that the palm was more powerful than the fist.

    Waist rotation and exploding force were also found in Shaolin Kungfu, but were emphasized in Taijiquan. My discoveries and aha experiences in Taijiquan enriched my practice and teaching of Shaolin Kungfu. Of course, my understanding and attainment in Shaolin Kungfu greatly enhanced my Taijiquan too. It was because of my Shaolin Kungfu that I could perform well in Taijiquan. Indeed, some people kindly said that my attainment in Taijiquan was better than many established Taijiquan masters.
    If you are interested on reading the full article, you can find it here.

    So, that led me to another question. Does Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu emphasize waist rotation? I would love to hear your thoughts on this.

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Beautiful Love Story!

    Originally posted by Nessa View Post
    Dear family,

    Thank you raising such interesting questions.

    Dear Santi, you asked: Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?

    If I would have to choose one over the other, I would choose Shaolin Kungfu. Why? Because within Shaolin Kungfu are all kungfu styles.

    When I was 14 years old I tried martial arts for the first time. I started with Aikido. I liked it a lot, but since I was in my teenage years, my attention span was rather short. I also tried boxing and other western styles, but I didn’t quite feel at home with any of them.
    Then through a lucky chance, when I was 19 years old, I found a Taiji teacher. My teacher did not emphasise combat in his teaching (as most Taiji teachers don’t), but he did teach Zen. For that, I am most grateful. All prior martial arts I had trained had lacked the mind aspect completely.
    Thus I was introduced to Zen training and zazen practice. It was through here that my interest towards eastern practices grew and I read a lot of literature on the subjects.
    I actually became a Taiji teacher myself, and taught Taiji for a couple of years in my teachers school.
    I also found another more traditional Taiji and Baji master, and spent a couple of years in his classes.

    But it was when my boyfriend (now my husband) went to Malaysia to an Intensive Chi Kung course, and came home with a big smile, that I knew I had to go as well. Half a year later I went to Malaysia myself. After that I stopped teaching Taiji, because I understood that what I had learned was only the form, and it would have been an insult (in my mind) to continue my teaching.

    Now I am very grateful to be able to teach Taijiquan as a complete martial art. Because of my background I am most passionate about it. But in my own practice I practice 75% Shaolin Kungfu and 25% Taijiquan. You could say that Shaolin Kungfu stole my heart.
    When I had first started Shaolin Chi Kung practice I used to sometimes get these rather strange chi flows where I would move in ways I had never learned anywhere. I asked Markus about it and he said they were Shaolin Kungfu movements. Later, after I had had the chance to attend a few kungfu courses with Sifu I started to lean towards Shaolin Kungfu more and more. I felt I had found my way home.
    I actually remember the first time I held a staff when I started learning the staff sets and felt very strongly “ Now I’m home.” I often get his feeling when I practice.

    So, if made to choose, I would choose Shaolin Kungfu. Luckily, I don’t have to, and can enjoy both of them.
    Actually, I would recommend practicing both arts, since they compliment each other in wonderful ways.


    Best wishes,

    Nessa
    Dear Nessa,

    Thanks so much for sharing your very inspiring and beautiful love story! It is wonderful how you where able to find your way back home and now can enjoy and share such wonderful blessings with others. I am very happy for you and those lucky enough to deserve learning from you!

    Best wishes,
    Angel

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Another vote for Wudang Taijiquan

    Originally posted by Dominic Roche View Post
    Dear Angel Sisook,

    Thank you for starting this interesting thread. My vote is for Wudang Tai Chi Chuan.

    Best wishes,
    Dominic.
    Dear Dominic,

    Thanks so much for your contribution to the conversation.

    Best wishes,
    Angel

    Leave a comment:


  • Nessa
    replied
    Shaolin Kungfu or Wahnam Taijiquan

    Dear family,

    Thank you raising such interesting questions.

    Dear Santi, you asked: Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?

    If I would have to choose one over the other, I would choose Shaolin Kungfu. Why? Because within Shaolin Kungfu are all kungfu styles.

    When I was 14 years old I tried martial arts for the first time. I started with Aikido. I liked it a lot, but since I was in my teenage years, my attention span was rather short. I also tried boxing and other western styles, but I didn’t quite feel at home with any of them.
    Then through a lucky chance, when I was 19 years old, I found a Taiji teacher. My teacher did not emphasise combat in his teaching (as most Taiji teachers don’t), but he did teach Zen. For that, I am most grateful. All prior martial arts I had trained had lacked the mind aspect completely.
    Thus I was introduced to Zen training and zazen practice. It was through here that my interest towards eastern practices grew and I read a lot of literature on the subjects.
    I actually became a Taiji teacher myself, and taught Taiji for a couple of years in my teachers school.
    I also found another more traditional Taiji and Baji master, and spent a couple of years in his classes.

    But it was when my boyfriend (now my husband) went to Malaysia to an Intensive Chi Kung course, and came home with a big smile, that I knew I had to go as well. Half a year later I went to Malaysia myself. After that I stopped teaching Taiji, because I understood that what I had learned was only the form, and it would have been an insult (in my mind) to continue my teaching.

    Now I am very grateful to be able to teach Taijiquan as a complete martial art. Because of my background I am most passionate about it. But in my own practice I practice 75% Shaolin Kungfu and 25% Taijiquan. You could say that Shaolin Kungfu stole my heart.
    When I had first started Shaolin Chi Kung practice I used to sometimes get these rather strange chi flows where I would move in ways I had never learned anywhere. I asked Markus about it and he said they were Shaolin Kungfu movements. Later, after I had had the chance to attend a few kungfu courses with Sifu I started to lean towards Shaolin Kungfu more and more. I felt I had found my way home.
    I actually remember the first time I held a staff when I started learning the staff sets and felt very strongly “ Now I’m home.” I often get his feeling when I practice.

    So, if made to choose, I would choose Shaolin Kungfu. Luckily, I don’t have to, and can enjoy both of them.
    Actually, I would recommend practicing both arts, since they compliment each other in wonderful ways.


    Best wishes,

    Nessa

    Leave a comment:


  • Dominic Roche
    replied
    Dear Angel Sisook,

    Thank you for starting this interesting thread. My vote is for Wudang Tai Chi Chuan.

    Best wishes,
    Dominic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Another vote for Wudang Taijiquan

    Originally posted by understanding View Post
    Dear Angel Sisook,

    Thank you for starting this excellent thread and sharing your heartfelt story.

    The great master Zhang San Feng called his Art as Taiji in his treatise. Even though I would prefer to call it as (Shaolin) Wudang Kungfu to emphasize its roots and put it apart from "mosquito catching" (Taiji dance), I don't think anyone could honor the Patriarch of Internal Martial Arts better than preserving both the name and essence he already gave it centuries ago.

    Dear Santi Sisook,



    I beg your forgiveness for being a poor substitute for Angel Sisook, but I wanted to share my thoughts.

    The essence of all martial arts is combat efficiency, hence the Essence of Shaolin concerns the best combat techniques of the greatest martial art. As it happens, this essential skill of combat efficiency can be trained and taught in many levels, from total beginners to marvellous application. Sigung also made a point to mention that the Essence of Shaolin is a pattern-set without having directly arranged combat sequences of its own, so the combat applications are made the finest essence.

    The pinnacle of all martial arts is when in addition to combat efficiency the martial art involves triple cultivation of jing, qi, and shen. It results in good health, vitality, longevity, and spiritual joys as everyone training martial arts in our School knows. Wudang Taijiquan was the first art, and also a refinement and spiritual offshoot of Shaolin Kungfu, to attain this peak. By calling it the "Pinnacle of Shaolin Kungfu" we rightfully honor and dignify Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu as a treasure of historical importance, even though there might be new developments such as Wudang Cotton Palm and Dragon Strength which might be even more cost efficient, representing modern pinnacles, for combat application and triple cultivation.

    With sincere respect,
    Olli
    Dear Olli,

    Thanks so much for yor comments. You don't need to appologize for making known your toughts. This is a place for learning and I hope this little conversation help us all understand better this wonderful arts and ourselves. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and taking part in the conversation. Your contribution is greatly apreciated.

    Best wishes,
    Angel

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Very interesting question

    Originally posted by sancrica View Post
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    I would like to thank you Angel Sidai for your wonderful and inspiring story. It is always so enriching to hear about other family members Shaolin Journeys. I am very sure that many family members will benefit from it. It is amazing to see what these wonderful Arts are capable of.

    Dear Anger Sidai, by reading your last post a question arose in my mind. Wudang Taijiquan/Kung Fu is the Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu. "The Essence of Shaolin" contains the best combat techniques of Shaolin Kung Fu and therefore it is called "The Essence of Shaolin". What is the difference between "The Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu" and "The Essence of Shaolin Kung Fu"?

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi
    Dear Santi,

    Thanks so much for your comments and I'm very happy that my very short and condenced story, brought some inspirartion to you. I am very pleased also that it had helped raised yet another very interesting question:

    What is the difference between "The Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu" and "The Essence of Shaolin Kung Fu"?
    I might have some clues, after taking the Course on the Essence of Shaolin, in the mean time, another question came to mind. A slightly different way of arranging your question. How The Essence of Shaolin will enrich and compliment our Wudang Kungfu practice? Again, that is something I look forward to experience during and after receiving Sifu's transmission of the Essence of Shaolin.

    Looking forward to more exciting conversation...

    Best wishes,
    Angel

    Leave a comment:


  • understanding
    replied
    Dear Angel Sisook,

    Thank you for starting this excellent thread and sharing your heartfelt story.

    The great master Zhang San Feng called his Art as Taiji in his treatise. Even though I would prefer to call it as (Shaolin) Wudang Kungfu to emphasize its roots and put it apart from "mosquito catching" (Taiji dance), I don't think anyone could honor the Patriarch of Internal Martial Arts better than preserving both the name and essence he already gave it centuries ago.

    Dear Santi Sisook,

    Originally posted by sancrica View Post
    Dear Anger Sidai, by reading your last post a question arose in my mind. Wudang Taijiquan/Kung Fu is the Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu. "The Essence of Shaolin" contains the best combat techniques of Shaolin Kung Fu and therefore it is called "The Essence of Shaolin". What is the difference between "The Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu" and "The Essence of Shaolin Kung Fu"?
    I beg your forgiveness for being a poor substitute for Angel Sisook, but I wanted to share my thoughts.

    The essence of all martial arts is combat efficiency, hence the Essence of Shaolin concerns the best combat techniques of the greatest martial art. As it happens, this essential skill of combat efficiency can be trained and taught in many levels, from total beginners to marvellous application. Sigung also made a point to mention that the Essence of Shaolin is a pattern-set without having directly arranged combat sequences of its own, so the combat applications are made the finest essence.

    The pinnacle of all martial arts is when in addition to combat efficiency the martial art involves triple cultivation of jing, qi, and shen. It results in good health, vitality, longevity, and spiritual joys as everyone training martial arts in our School knows. Wudang Taijiquan was the first art, and also a refinement and spiritual offshoot of Shaolin Kungfu, to attain this peak. By calling it the "Pinnacle of Shaolin Kungfu" we rightfully honor and dignify Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu as a treasure of historical importance, even though there might be new developments such as Wudang Cotton Palm and Dragon Strength which might be even more cost efficient, representing modern pinnacles, for combat application and triple cultivation.

    With sincere respect,
    Olli

    Leave a comment:


  • sancrica
    replied
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    I would like to thank you Angel Sidai for your wonderful and inspiring story. It is always so enriching to hear about other family members Shaolin Journeys. I am very sure that many family members will benefit from it. It is amazing to see what these wonderful Arts are capable of.

    Dear Anger Sidai, by reading your last post a question arose in my mind. Wudang Taijiquan/Kung Fu is the Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu. "The Essence of Shaolin" contains the best combat techniques of Shaolin Kung Fu and therefore it is called "The Essence of Shaolin". What is the difference between "The Pinnacle of Shaolin Kung Fu" and "The Essence of Shaolin Kung Fu"?

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi

    Leave a comment:


  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Why I chosen to practice Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu

    Originally posted by sancrica View Post
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    I think that both names honor greatly this wonderful Art and both names are, in my opinion, great names.

    I believe that, in our school, there is an emphasis to differentiate Tai Chi Chuan from Shaolin Kung Fu. Therefore, there are two different Syllabus. One for Shaolin Kung Fu and another one for Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan.

    This thread, again, is a great opportunity for learning more about these wonderful Arts. Why do we differentiate Shaolin Kung Fu from Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan? If both arts are coming from Shaolin Kung Fu, why the differentiation? Is it because their philosophy is different? or maybe because of their principles and practice?

    I heard Sifu saying that Shaolin Kung Fu practitioners will benefit much from learning Tai Chi Chuan and Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan practitioners would benefit much from learning Shaolin Kung Fu. There must be then a difference between Shaolin Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan. May I ask what that difference is?

    If we choose to call it Wudang Kung Fu, because of the reasons stated on this thread, then Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan would inevitably follow the same reasoning as Tai Chi Chuan originated from Zhang San Feng and would have to be called Wahnam Kung Fu.

    I found an interesting explanation from Sifu stating the differences between Shaolin Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan:



    The complete article is found here.

    I am looking forward hearing your thoughts on this matter. It is a very interesting discussion. :-)

    Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi
    Dear Santi,

    Thanks again for your excellent comments and questions. We got lucky earlier having your questions answered directly from Sifu!
    Hopefuly, we might get lucky and your questions and comments will find answers and or some interesting thoughts from some of our family members as well.

    And to start, I will like to answer your question:

    Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?
    I have chosen to practice Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu because it's the pinnacle of Shaolin Kungfu. I have always srtived for excelence and always been very curious about finding the ultimate answers to problems and situations in my life. That had lead me to find slowly but surely to find the absolute best teachers in both my passions. Spiritual cultivation and Martial Arts.

    Years before I started my formal Spiritual cultivation in sitting meditation, I had already started my formal martial arts training in Karate, where I achieved local and international recognition due to my excellent fighting skills. But I was not satisfied! Something was missing, so due to my continued search I was lead to find my Guru. The last Realised Master in the Kriya Yoga lineage, the mother sourse of all Yogas, mentioned in the Vedas.

    That came at a pivotal moment in my life, where my marriage and family environment was crushed to the ground. So I did the next best thing, and that was to immerse myself on my spritual practice and tried to find answers to deal with such a mess. Had to deal with false acusations, which lead to being arrested and incarserated falsly, being denied acces to my loving children at their most vulnareble ages, having my children basically secuestred and not knowing where they might be, having to deal with the rejection and disrigard of "friends" and neighbours, having to deal with my daugher being molested by my expartner's new boyfriend and not being able to deffend her, etc...

    So, answers I found from the deepest parts of my Self and continued walking my walk and walking my talk, or my Spirit's talk and walk, and slowly but surely, by the grace of Guru, Truth revealed itself and I was able to gain Legal Custody of all my children, one by one... Talk about Yu-Wei and Wu-Wei? I know by experience not even praticing "consciously".

    After some years of dealing with such matters I finally was able to continue my Martial Arts training, so my search for a real Kungfu master lead me to learn from a very "recognized" local teacher. Famous for his impecable Kungu "Forms". Member of the International Wushu Federation, I don't need to get into details where this is going... So, after some years of training and learning Taiji Dance and Qigong (Gentle Physical Excercises), I started to feel the urge to continue my search of a real Master.

    Thanks to my previous Sifu, I did already know what not to look for, so I was intruduced to Sifu's teaching's from a very "special" student who came to the Kwoon. For some reason she even had and gave me Sifu's personal phone number! So I ordered Sifu's Art of Chi Kung and the Complete Book of Tai Chi Chuan, and that was it. I knew then my search was over!

    After being accepted as a student by Sifu in 2009, I started practicing my Taiji Dance following Sifu's advice and letting go everything else, immersed myself in this wonderful journey of discovery. It did not took long before I started to sense the difference and my Taiji Dance slowly but surely became something different, it came alive. I cannot say it is Taijiquan or Wudang Kungfu just yet, as I am still discovering how to master the skills to use it for combat for slowly but surely I am getting there.

    You see I was already a very succesful fighter and I was lucky to find also a very rare and beautiful meditation technique in which I was initiated by a Realized Master so to find Sifu and his generosity in guiding me to continue discovering how to manifest this wonderful art of Wudang Taijiquan/Kungfu was the only thing missing in my journey. What's left is to continue learning and training of how to achieve the absolute potential in this lifetime...

    Being able to master this wonderful art to its maximum potential in all its dimensions an achieve the pinnacle in Kungfu development in this lifetime is my honorable aim. That will be my humble contribution to bring back the glory of Kungfu! Whether I will be able to achieve my noble aim, remains to be seen, but surely, I will continue do my best to diligently practice acording to Sifu's instructions...

    Best wishes,
    Angel
    Last edited by Angel Guillermo; 23 July 2017, 08:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • sancrica
    replied
    Dear Shaolin Wahnam Family,

    I think that both names honor greatly this wonderful Art and both names are, in my opinion, great names.

    I believe that, in our school, there is an emphasis to differentiate Tai Chi Chuan from Shaolin Kung Fu. Therefore, there are two different Syllabus. One for Shaolin Kung Fu and another one for Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan.

    This thread, again, is a great opportunity for learning more about these wonderful Arts. Why do we differentiate Shaolin Kung Fu from Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan? If both arts are coming from Shaolin Kung Fu, why the differentiation? Is it because their philosophy is different? or maybe because of their principles and practice?

    I heard Sifu saying that Shaolin Kung Fu practitioners will benefit much from learning Tai Chi Chuan and Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan practitioners would benefit much from learning Shaolin Kung Fu. There must be then a difference between Shaolin Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan. May I ask what that difference is?

    If we choose to call it Wudang Kung Fu, because of the reasons stated on this thread, then Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan would inevitably follow the same reasoning as Tai Chi Chuan originated from Zhang San Feng and would have to be called Wahnam Kung Fu.

    I found an interesting explanation from Sifu stating the differences between Shaolin Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan:

    Both Shaolin Kungfu and Tai Chi Chuan are great martial arts originally developed by the Chinese but now practised by people of different race, culture and religion. While there are similar in their general aims and benefits, they are also very different in their philosophy and practice.

    Generally speaking, both Shaolin Kungfu and Tai Chi Chuan aim to provide benefits attaining combat efficiency, health and vitality, longevity, mind expansion and spiritual joy. The details and approach, however, are quite different. For example, in their practice, Shaolin Kungfu is normally done in a fast, powerful manner, whereas Tai Chi Chuan is performed slowly and gracefully. This gives the general, but not exactly correct, impression that Shaolin Kungfu is "hard", whereas Tai Chi Chuan is "soft". What many people do not realize is that if we perform Shaolin Kungfu slowly, it may look like Tai Chi Chuan; and if we perform Tai Chi Chuan fast, it may look like Shaolin Kungfu.

    Shaolin philosophy is Zen in nature, whereas that of Tai Chi Chuan is Taoist. Hence, Shaolin techniques are simple, direct and effective, which are characteristic of Zen Buddhism. Tai Chi Chuan techniques are flowing and continuous, reflecting the water process regarded as the supreme of the five elemental processes in Taoism.

    Shaolin philosophy pays much attention to compassion and wisdom, the two hallmarks of Mahayana Buddhism, of which Zen Buddhism is a major school. Shaolin disciples, therefore, avoid hurting their opponents in combat, and meditation (the path to cosmic wisdom) constitutes an integral part of their training.

    Taoist philosophy pays much attention to going along with nature, and attaining longevity and immortality. Tai Chi Chuan disciples, therefore, flow with their opponents' movements (instead of going against them), and chi kung (the art to good health and longevity, and for those who are ready, to immortality) forms an essential part of their practice.
    The complete article is found here.

    I am looking forward hearing your thoughts on this matter. It is a very interesting discussion. :-)

    Another question I would love to hear the answer from the Shaolin Wahnam Family: Why would you choose to practice Shaolin Kung Fu rather than Wahnam Tai Chi Chuan or the other way around?

    With Love, Care and Shaolin Salute,

    Santi

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  • Angel Guillermo
    replied
    Focusing Spirit Accumulating Energy Treatise In Grand Ultimate Practice

    Dear Family,


    Greetings! Thanks so much for your comments. So far we have 6 votes for Wudnag Taijiquan against 5 votes for Wudang Kungfu. I tend to prefer Wudang Kungfu instead of Wudang Taijiquan, for sentimental reasons. I guess that, like Sifu, which has spent his life doing his absolute best to spread the genuine Shaolin Arts, I also would love to see the Glory of Kungfu, restored once more, not only in our school, but elsewhere, especially back in China.


    During the course of the conversation and reading some your comments, I realized that genuine Kungfu (Shaolinquan) is alive, especially in our school and like the name itself suggests, Wudang Taijiquan (Wudang Taiji quan fa), already incorporates, the term Kungfu (Shaolinquan, quan fa) in it.


    Like Sifu had stated many times before:


    Many people who practice Taijiquan, or Tai Chi Chuan, in the West may be surprised that it is actually an effective martial art. "Quan" (pronounced as "ch'uan") in the term "Taijiquan" is the short form for "quan fa", a Chinese term which corresponds to what westerners would call "kungfu". It is significant to note that "Shaolin Kungfu" is called "Shaolinquan" in Chinese, which is the short form for "Shaolin quan fa". "Taiji" means "the grand ultimate", which is the Chinese term for the cosmos. Hence, Taijiquan really means "Cosmos Kungfu". - Sifu


    We are lucky, we already know and practice what many people ignore to even exists and what many people only read in books and watch in movies.


    Over the course of his teaching career Sifu has always made an effort to make things easier and simpler to understand, that’s the mark of a great teacher. I believe that Sifu has made history already, whether others outside our school, may realize it or not.


    Whether Immortal Zhang San Feng intended his teachings to be named Taijiquan, remains a mystery to me, but one thing is clear from reading his Treatise “FOCUSING SPIRIT ACCUMULATING ENERGY TREATISE IN GRAND ULTIMATE PRACTICE” which Sifu has made available to us, is that the name is already implied in the tittle.


    I’m inclined to think that Immortal Zhang San Feng’s practice and teaching methodology became softer and more flowing, do to a natural progression, the same way Sifu’s practice and teaching methodology has become softer and more flowing as the years progress.


    Sifu might say, and I have heard him say it, that him being softer has to do with his “westernization”, but I would suggest that it might also do to his natural progression in mastering the Shaolin Arts, like Immortal Zhang San Feng did.


    So I might feel, for sentimental reasons, inclined to call it Wudang Kungfu, but I think the more appropriate way to call it might be Wudang Taiiquan.


    During our practice and or our teaching, we could continue to use both terms, in order to make different points real or to make different points false.


    Looking forward to hearing more comments.


    Best wishes,
    Angel

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